USS Ohio BB-12 - History

USS Ohio BB-12 - History


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USS Ohio BB-12

Ohio III
(BB-12: dp. 12,723; 1. 393'10", b. 72'3"; dr. 23'10"; s. 18 k.; cpl. 561; a. 4 12", 16 6", 6 3", 8 3-pdr., 6 1-pdr., 2 .30 eel. mg.; cl. Maine)

The third Ohio (BB 12) was laid down 22 April 1899 by Union Iron Works, San Francisco, Calif.; launched 18 May 1901; sponsored by Miss Helen Desehler; and commissioned 4 October 1904, Captain Leavitt C. Logan in command.

Designated flagship of th¢ Asiatic Flcet, Ohio departed San Francisco 1 April 1905 for Manila, where she embarked the party of then Seeretary of War William Howard Taft, which included Miss Alice Roosevelt, the President's daughter. She conducted this party on much of its Far Eastern tour of inspection, and continued the cruise in Japanese, Chinese and Phllippine waters until returning to the United States in 1907.

Ohio sailed out of Hampton Roads, Va., 16 December 1907 with the battleships of the Atlantic Fleet. Guns crashed a salute to President Theodore Roosevelt while he reviewed the Great White Fleet as it began the cruise around the world which, perhaps more than any other event, marked the emergence of the United States as a major world Power.

Commanded by Rear Admiral Robley D. Evans, and later, Rear Admiral Charles S. Sperry, the fleet made ealls on the east and west Beasts of South America, rounding the Horn in between, en route to San Francisco. On 7 July 1908, Ohio and her sisters shaped their course west to Hawafi, New Zealand and Australia. On each visit the American ships were welcome] with great enthusiasm, but none of their ports of eall received them with such enthusiastic friendliness as Tokyo where they anchored 18 October. The fleet's presence in Japan, symbolized both American friendship and strength and helped to ease dangerously strained relations between the two countries.

The fleet put in at Amoy and returned to Yokohama, held target praetiee in the Philippines, and was homeward-bound 1 December. After steaming through the Suez Canal 4 January 1909, the fleet made Mediterranean calls, before anehormg in Hampton Roads 22 February.

Ohio sailed on to New York, her home port for the next 4 years during duty training men of the New York Naval Militia and performing general service with the Atlantic Fleet.

In 1914 she sailed to the Gulf of Mexico to join in the patrol off Vera Cruz, protecting American interests endangered by Mexican political turmoil. Ohio returned north in the summer for a Naval Academy midshipmen cruise, then joined the Reserve Fleet at Philadelphia, recommissioning for each of the next two summers' midshipmen cruises, 1915 and 1916.

Soon after the United States entered World War I, Ohio recommissioned 24 April 1917. Throughout the war, she operated out of Norfolk, training crews for the expanding fleet, taking part in battleship maneuvers. She arrived at Philadelphia 28 November 1918; was placed in reserve there 7 January 1919; decommissioned 31 May 1922; and was sold for scrapping 24 March 1923.

A fourth Ohio (BB-68) was authorized 19 July 1940, and her construction assigned to the Philadelphia Navy Yard. Construction was cancelled 21 July 1943.


USS Ohio BB-12 - History

The Ohio (SSBN 726) is the first Trident-class nuclear-powered fleet ballistic missile submarine and the fourth United States vessel to bear the name of the 17th state of the union.

In the summer of 1981, sea trials were held to test the equipment and systems, and the submarine was delivered to the US Navy on October 28, 1981. On November 11, USS Ohio was commissioned. Capt. A. K. Thompson assumed command of the "Blue" Crew and Capt. A. F. Campbell assumed command of the "Gold".

Following Post Shakedown Availability (PSA) at Electric Boat Division, the Ohio left the Atlantic Ocean and transited to her new homeport, Bangor, Wash., by way of Cape Canaveral where she tested her missile launch systems and the Panama Canal, arriving on August 12, 1982. During August and September 1982, the first loadout of Trident C-4 missiles and a predeployment refit were conducted. Ohio and her Blue Crew departed on the first Trident Submarine Strategic Deterrent Patrol in October 1982 and returned on Dec. 10.

April 28, 1986 USS Ohio (Gold) successfully launched two Trident I (C4) missiles during a Follow-on Operational Test. The Ohio completed the 50th Trident I patrol Nov. 22.

April 17, 1989 SSBN 726 successfully launched two Trident I missiles in support of the 33nd Trident Follow-on Operational Test.

August 31, 1992 USS Ohio Gold Crew successfully launched two Trident I missiles during a Follow-on CINC Evaluation Test.

From July 1, 1993, to June 10, 1994, USS Ohio underwent engineered overhaul (EOH) at PSNS receiving extensive upgrades to sonar, fire control, and navigation systems.

October 22, The Ohio Gold Crew successfully launched a Trident I (C4) DASO missile.

USS Ohio resumed strategic deterrent patrols on January 25, 1995, as part of Submarine Squadron Seventeen, Submarine Group Nine, Pacific Submarine Force.

May 16, 1996 The Ohio successfully launched four Trident I missiles during a Follow-on CINC Evaluation Test.

December 9, 2001 USS Ohio successfully launched four C4 missiles during a Follow-on CINC Evaluation Test. Also successfully launched four missiles Dec. 18.

SSBN 726 has been out of service since October 1, 2002, for conversion to guided missile submarine-class (SSGN) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. She began its engineered refueling overhaul (ERO) in November 2002 and began conversion work November 19, 2003.

Four Ohio-class strategic missile submarines, USS Ohio, USS Michigan (SSBN 727), USS Florida (SSBN 728), and USS Georgia (SSBN 729) have been selected for transformation into a new platform, designated SSGN. Twenty-two of the 24 missile tubes on each boat are being retrofitted to carry up to seven Tomahawk cruise missiles, for a maximum load out of 154 missiles per boat. The remaining two tubes are being converted into Lock-in/Lock-out chambers for use by Special Operations Forces (SOF). Each SSGN will be able to carry and support up to 66 Special Operation Forces for an extended period of time. These ships will have a specialized planning area, physical fitness equipment, and laser shooting ranges for use by the Operators. Further, SSGN will be able to carry two Advanced SEAL (Sea, Air, Land) Delivery Systems, two Dry Deck Shelters, or one of each using the lock-in/lock-out chambers as their docking sites. Another advantage of SSGNs&rsquo size will be its ability to carry an increased payload. In the future, this capacity will allow for the launch and recovery of unmanned undersea vehicles (UUV). As new capabilities and equipment are developed, they can be inserted relatively easily into SSGNs thanks to its Open Architecture computing systems and the related ability to rapidly integrate new technologies and payloads. SSGN can also offer significant opportunities to serve as a test platform to develop future weapons, sensors and operational concepts.

December 19, 2005 USS Ohio (SSGN 726), commanded by Cmdr. Michael Cockey, returned to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Facility in Bremerton, Wash, after completing sea trials.

February 7, 2006 USS Ohio returned to active service in a ceremony held at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor. Annie Glenn, the ship&rsquos sponsor, presented the crew a ship&rsquos patch worn by Sen. John Glenn on his return to space in 1998. The patch was autographed by all seven astronauts aboard the shuttle and will now be displayed in the wardroom.

October 26, The guided-missile submarine returned home after becoming the first Ohio-class ship to complete sea and hydrodynamic trials with recently installed dual dry deck shelters (DDS) for Special Operations Forces.

November 20, USS Ohio pulled to Naval Station Pearl Harbor for a scheduled port visit. SSGN 726 is currently conducting training exercises and work-ups in the Hawaiian islands in preparation for its maiden deployment next year.

January 21, 2007 USS Ohio (Gold) Sailors, commanded by Capt. Andrew Hale, departed Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, for Pearl Harbor to conduct a crew swap with Ohio (Blue) crew. The Gold crew gathered at NBK's liberty center before traveling to McCord Air Force Base to catch their plane to Hawaii. This is the first time in approximately 20 years that a submarine crew has done a crew swap in this fashion. Eventually, the submarine crews will fly out to Guam and swap about every three months, and the ship will return home approximately once a year.

October 14, USS Ohio (Blue) departed homeport for its maiden deployment as a guided-missile submarine to the western Pacific.

January 10, 2008 SSGN 726 arrived to Apra Harbor, Guam, for a Crew Swap. The Ohio is scheduled to have three crew swaps and then return to Bangor, Wash.

February 20, USS Ohio arrived in Busan, Republic of Korea, to participate in exercise Key Resolve/Foal Eagle, an annual combined/joint exercise involving forces from both the U.S. and Republic of Korea.

October 16, The Ohio pulled to Yokosuka, Japan, for a routine port visit.

November 6, Capt. R. Murray Gero Jr. relieved Capt. Christopher Ratliff as CO of USS Ohio (Blue) during a change-of-command ceremony at the Naval Undersea Museum in Keyport.

November 19, SSGN 726 completed its participation in Annual Exercise (ANNUALEX) 2008, between the U.S. Navy and the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force.

December 22, The Ohio (Gold) returned to Bangor, Wash., after a 14-month underway period.

August 29, 2009 USS Ohio (Blue) arrived in Yokosuka for its first port visit after departing Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor for a scheduled 12-month deployment.

January 21, 2010 The guided-missile submarine recently pulled to Apra Harbor, Guam, for a routine port call.

February 19, Capt. Dixon K. Hicks relieved Capt. Dennis Carpenter as CO of USS Ohio (Gold) during a change-of-command ceremony at the Naval Undersea Museum in Keyport.

March 14, USS Ohio pulled to HMAS Stirling at Garden Island, marking the first port visit of an Ohio-class submarine to an Australian port.

June 25, SSGN 726 (Gold) recently pulled into Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines, for a scheduled port call.

September 17, Rear Adm. James Caldwell, Commander, Submarine Group 9 (CSG9), relieved of duty Capt. R. Murray Gero Jr. due to a "loss of confidence in his ability to command." The relief occurred as a result of an investigation into allegations of inappropriate personal behavior that eroded good order and discipline. Cmdr. Theodore Schroeder, deputy commander of Submarine Squadron 19, assumed temporary command of USS Ohio.

November 10, Capt. Brian N. Humm relieved Cmdr. Theodore Schroeder as CO of USS Ohio (Blue) during a change-of-command ceremony at Bangor.

May 1, 2011 The Ohio is currently at Naval Base Guam making preparations for the western Pacific deployment.

July 13, USS Ohio (Gold) pulled into Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a routine port call.

August 4, SSGN 726 conducted a live fire of a Tomahawk Land Attack Missile (TLAM), while submerged near the Northern Mariana Islands, successfully hitting its aim point on the Farallon de Medinilla Island, in an established live-fire training range, about 150 miles north of Guam.

August 8, The Ohio pulled into Apra Harbor, Guam, for its voyage repair and crew swap period.

October 1, USS Ohio (Blue) arrived in Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines, for a scheduled port visit.

November 11, The guided-missile submarine recently pulled into Apra Harbor, Guam, to conduct maintenance.

March 6, 2012 USS Ohio (Blue) moored at Naval Magazine Indian Island, Wash., to offload ordnance after recently completed the 14-month patrol.

March 9, Capt. Rodney A. Mills relieved Capt. Dixon K. Hicks as CO of the Ohio (Gold) during a change-of-command ceremony at the Naval Undersea Museum in Keyport.

July 11, SSGN 726 completed a 16-week Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA) at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF).

October 3, USS Ohio (Blue) departed Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after a four-week port call.?

October 24, The Ohio arrived at Busan Naval Base, Republic of Korea, for a five-day port visit. Participated in biennial exercise Keen Sword 2013 from Nov. 5-16.

December 14, Capt. George P. Norman relieved Capt. Brian N. Humm as CO of the SSGN 726 (Blue) during a change-of-command ceremony at the Naval Undersea Museum.

March 22, 2013 USS Ohio (Gold) moored outboard the USS Emory S. Land (AS 39) at Alava Pier in Subic Bay for a Fleet Maintenance Availability (FMAV).

April 11, SSGN 726 pulled into Apra Harbor, Guam, for its voyage repair and crew swap period.

September 20, The Ohio (Gold) recently arrived in Guam for a routine port call.

October 15, The guided-missile submarine recently pulled into Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a brief port call.

October 2?, USS Ohio returned to homeport after a 14-month deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet AoR.

January 17, 2014 Capt. Michael D. Lewis relieved Capt. Rodney A. Mills as CO of SSGN 726 (Gold) during a change-of-command ceremony at the Naval Undersea Museum in Keyport, Wash.

March 29, The Ohio recently arrived in Naval Base Point Loma in San Diego, Calif., for emergent repairs.?

July 7, Capt. Broderick V. Berkhout relieved Capt. George P. Norman as CO of the USS Ohio (Blue) during a change-of-command ceremony at the Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor's Deterrent Park.

June 26, 2015 USS Ohio moored at Ammunition Pier, Naval Magazine Indian Island in Port Townsend, Wash., for ammo onload following a 12-month Major Maintenance Period (MMP) at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Wash.

August 1?, USS Ohio (Blue) departed Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor for its fifth western Pacific patrol as a guided-missile submarine.

August 29, SSGN 726 pulled into Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a routine port call.

November 14, The Ohio moored outboard the USS Emory S. Land at Sepanggar Naval Base in Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia, for a four-day Fleet Maintenance Availability (FMAV).

December 1, USS Ohio (Blue) recently moored at Bravo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for its voyage repair and a crew swap period.

March 22, 2016 USS Ohio (Gold) moored at Alava Pier in Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines, for a scheduled port visit.

April 12, The guided-missile submarine recently pulled into Apra Harbor for its voyage repair and a crew swap period.

April 20, Capt. Gerald N. Miranda, Jr., relieved Capt. Michael D. Lewis as CO of the USS Ohio (Gold) during a change-of-command ceremony at the Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor chapel.

June 30, The Ohio (Blue) moored at Berth 13S in Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan, for a week-long port visit Moored at Berth 1 in Busan Naval Base, ROK, on July 13.

September 1, SSGN 726 recently moored at Bravo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a four-week voyage repair and a crew swap period.

November 3, USS Ohio (Gold) made a brief stop off White Beach Naval Facility in Okinawa, Japan, for personnel transfer.?

November 10, Capt. David S. Soldow relieved Capt. Broderick V. Berkhout as CO of the USS Ohio (Blue) during a change-of-command ceremony at the Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor chapel.

January ?, 2017 USS Ohio (Gold) moored at Bravo Wharf in Apra Harbor for its voyage repair and a crew swap period.

March 23, USS Ohio (Blue) moored at Ammunition Pier, Naval Magazine Indian Island following an extended 19-month patrol.

April 4, The Ohio moored at Pier 5, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for a Major Maintenance Period (MMP) Entered the Dry Dock #2 on April 25.

March 7, 2018 Capt. Andrew J. Kimsey relieved Capt. David S. Soldow as CO of the SSGN 726 (Blue) during a change-of-command ceremony at the Naval Undersea Museum in Keyport, Wash.

August 6, Capt. William C. Johnson relieved Capt. Gerald N. Miranda, Jr., as CO of the Ohio (Gold) during a change-of-command ceremony at the Naval Undersea Museum.

December ?, USS Ohio undocked and moored at Pier 5 on Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Completed availability on Aug. 14, 2019.

September 13, The Ohio moored at Pier B12 on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii Underway on Nov. 16 Moored at Pier B12 again on Nov. 20.

January 21, 2020 Capt. Brian G. Freck relieved Capt. Andrew J. Kimsey as CO of the Ohio (Blue) during a change-of-command ceremony at the Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor chapel.

September 19, USS Ohio departed Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after piersided for 10 months Moored at Bravo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, from Oct. 9- Dec. ?.

January 4, 2021 The Ohio (Gold), commanded by Capt. Kurt D. Balagna, made a brief stop in Apra Harbor for personnel transfer Brief stop in Apra Harbor again on Jan. 24.

February 2, SSGN 726 participated in an integration exercise, off the coast of Okinawa, with the Marines from Force Reconnaissance Company, III Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Moored at Bravo Wharf in Apra Harbor from Feb. ?-9 and June 1-4.


USS Ohio BB-12 - History

USS OHIO (SSBN 726) is the first TRIDENT Class nuclear powered fleet ballistic missile submarine and the fourth United States vessel to bear the name of the seventeenth state of the union.

The second OHIO was a sailing ship-of-the-line launched in 1820. She spent most of her 55 years of service in reserve, being reactivated when needed. In 1838 she served as flag ship for Commodore Isaac Hull in the Mediterranean. In 1847, she served in the Gulf of Mexico during the Mexican War and in the Pacific Squadron on the coast of South America and California during the gold rush days. The second OHIO was finally decommissioned in 1875.

On 28 December 1940, The name USS OHIO, BB-68 was assigned to the Montana class battleship designed during World War II. This was to be the second ship in a five ship class which would have been the largest US battleship built displacing 70,965 tons full load and mounting twelve 16" guns. The Montana class was cancelled on 21 July 1943 before construction began.


On 2 February 1978, the OHIO (SSBN 726) Precommissioning Unit was formed. Commander A. K. Thompson was its Commanding Officer.

On 7 April 1979, OHIO was launched and christened by Mrs. Annie Glenn, wife of Senator John H. Glenn. In the summer of 1981, several sea trials were held to test the equipments, systems and ship that were to be accepted by the United States Navy. These sea trials were an unqualified success.

On 11 November 1981, USS OHIO (SSBN 726) was commissioned at Electric Boat Division in Groton, Connecticut. The principal speaker, The Honorable George Bush, Vice President of the United States, remarked to the 8,000 assembled guests that the ship introduced a "new dimension in our nation's strategic deterrence." During the ceremony, Admiral Hyman G. Rickover noted that the OHIO should "strike fear in the hearts of our enemies." On that day, Captain A. K. Thompson assumed command of USS OHIO (SSBN 726)(BLUE) and Captain A. F. Campbell assumed command of USS OHIO (SSBN 726)(GOLD).

Following Post Shakedown Availability at Electric Boat Division, OHIO left the Atlantic and transited to her new home port, Bangor, Washington, arriving on 12 August 1982.

During August and September 1982, the first loadout of Trident C- 4 missiles on a Trident Class Submarine and a predeployment refit were conducted. USS OHIO and her Blue Crew, departed on the first Trident Submarine Strategic Deterrent Patrol in October 1982.

From June 1993 to June 1994 USS OHIO underwent overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, the first for a Trident submarine. The ship received extensive upgrades to sonar, fire control, and navigation systems. USS OHIO resumed strategic deterrent patrols in January 1995. OHIO has completed sixty-one strategic deterrent patrols.


Conclusion

The release of the USS Ohio is a welcome addition to the list of United States Navy pre-dreadnoughts produced by Iron Shipwrights. A USS New Jersey (BB-16) has just been released – hopefully this means a Connecticut-class will be in the offing (Update: The Connecticut was eventually released).

For the most part, the model is well cast and appears to be in scale. Without a set of plans, I can’t vouch for the accuracy, but the kit appears to match photos and line drawings. The weakest part of this kit are the small parts and instructions, but that shouldn’t prevent you from being able to build a decent replica of this pre-dreadnought battleship for your collection. My verdict: I would recommend this model to anyone who’s built a resin kit and has some photo-etch experience under their belt.

The USS Ohio retails for $225.95. I purchased mine directly from Iron Shipwright.


USS Ohio (SSGN-726 / SSBN-726)

Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 04/30/2021 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.

The Soviet Union and the West were involved in a high stakes game of cat and mouse throughout the Cold War decades. For every keen technical advancement one side made, the other had to counter the triumph, often times matching or surpassing the previous threat. Submariners and their underwater vessels were a key player in the "containment wars" fought during this period and would become the focus of future developments that would serve only to increase the potency of the submarine - far from that of their days as torpedo-minded warships during World War 2. The USS Ohio was a product of the Cold War, designed with a lethal capability to engage enemy submarines and high-value surface targets through the latest in available systems and technology. She began life as the USS Ohio (SSBN-726) in her original ballistic missile submarine form but would later transition to the new role of guided missile submarine under the marker of "SSGN-726". The Ohio-class was formulated to take over the role of the preceding Benjamin Franklin- and Lafayette-class vessels. The new class also represented the largest submarines ever produced for the American navy and her armament out-weighed even that of the greatest Soviet classes of the time.

The USS Ohio was ordered on July 1st, 1974 with her construction contracted out to General Dynamics Electric Boat - the boat being produced from pre-completed sections. Her keel was laid down on April 10th, 1976 and she was officially launched on April 7th, 1979 - politics and shipyard issues delaying formal trials for some time. The vessel was formally commissioned on November 11th, 1981 (Veterans Day) and she went on to make her home port out of Bangor, Washington in the American northwest, fighting under the official motto of "Always First" (as well as the unofficial "First and Finest"). The USS Ohio represented the lead ship of the Ohio-class of warships which went on to include the USS Henry M. Jackson, the USS Alabama, the USS Alaska, the USS Nevada, the USS Tennessee, the USS Pennsylvania, the USS Florida, the USS Georgia, the USS West Virginia, the USS Kentucky, the USS Maryland, the USS Michigan, the USS Nebraska, the USS Rhode Island, the USS Maine, the USS Wyoming and the USS Louisiana. Only four of these vessels - the USS Ohio, the USS Michigan, the USS Florida and the USS Georgia would be selected for the upcoming SSGN modifications. The USS Louisiana represented the last completed Ohio-class submarine.

Outwardly, the USS Ohio was designed with a conventional shape - essentially a tube with stabilization and control fins as well as the requisite sail. The sail was held ahead of amidships with dive planes emanating from the sail sides. The overall hull design was relatively featureless and sported a well-rounded nose cone and tapered stern. The stern managed the propeller as well as the rudder planes. The USS Ohio displaced at 16,500 long tons when surfaced and 18,450 long tons when submerged. She fielded a 560 foot overall length with a beam measuring 42 feet. Power came from a single S8G PWR series nuclear reactor that fuels 2 x geared turbines. An auxiliary motor provided up to 325 horsepower. The single propeller shaft operated with an output of 60,000 shaft horsepower allowing for surfaced speeds of up to 12 knots and submerged speeds of over 20 knots. Due to her nuclear propulsion suite, the range of the USS Ohio was essentially unlimited, capped only by her ability to keep food stores supplied and crew morale in check. The vessel was crewed by approximately 155 personnel made up of 15 officers and 140 sailors.

The USS Ohio was categorized as an "attack submarine" and, as such, she was armed with an offensive-minded stock consisting of torpedoes and ballistic missiles. Her design was such that she was completed with 4 x 21" (530mm) torpedo launch tubes in the bow section of the hull. This weapon allowed for engagement of enemy surface vessels and submarines alike. The more potent arm of the Ohio weapons suite was her 24 x Trident series submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM) - forming the "first strike" thermonuclear reach of the United States Navy for a time.

Perhaps the oft-overlooked part of the submarine was its powerful array of sensors which allowed the crew to remain undetected and track potential threats in turn. The USS Ohio was fitted with the BQQ-6 series sonar at the bow while a BQR-19 system handled navigation. The BQS-13 was an active sonar array while the TB-16 was a towed sonar array. Altogether, these systems - in conjunction with their well-trained operators - allowed the USS Ohio to be a highly-feared vessel of the deep for some time - a level of respect carried over to this day.

After her SSGN modifications, the USS Ohio replaced her Trident missile stores with Tomahawk cruise missiles - this battery consisting of 22 launch tubes each fitting up to seven cruise missiles for a total of 154 missiles, a massive amount of firepower for a single vessel. The cruise missile could be used to engage surface targets at very long ranges, out of the range of enemy defenses, and the Ohio could even remain submerged during launch.

The USS Ohio formally underwent trails throughout the summer of 1981 before being handed over to the US Navy in October of that same year to which the vessel began formal operations at sea. She was brought up to speed throughout 1982, conducting various voyages and undergoing various tests, particularly of her launch facilities. A refit period in 1993 saw her updated with modern systems to keep the vessel viable and as potent as ever. More patrols then followed until the new millennium which saw several of the Ohio-class boats revised to the guided missile submarine (SSGN) role. Since completion of this modification in 2006, the USS Ohio has remained in active USN service, continuing the role of deterrent the world over.

Submarines like the USS Ohio can also be used in clandestine operations, inserting or extracting special forces elements such as Navy SEALs.

Update July 2012: On July 11, 2012, the USS Ohio (SSGN 726) completed her fourth Major Maintenance Period (MMP) since her 2006 conversion from a ballistic missile submarine to a guided-missile submarine. Ohio entered the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility in mid-April (2012) to which the boat spent 65 days in dry dock (an SSGN requires a MMP for every 12 months of deployment). The combined efforts of the civilian workmen and the Ohio's Blue and Gold crews accomplished the job. Repair and upgrades during the MMP were on a number of systems including sonar, radar, communication and navigation suites. Also standard checks and repairs were made on the superstructure, and controlling tanks for depth and conditioning units. Additional systems upgraded were water planes and valves used for seawater and ventilation.

USS Ohio has since returned to active duty and is recertified for combat.


USS Ohio (SSGN-726 / SSBN-726)

The Soviet Union and the West were involved in a high stakes game of cat and mouse throughout the Cold War decades. For every keen technical advancement one side made, the other had to counter the triumph, often times matching or surpassing the previous threat. Submariners and their underwater vessels were a key player in the "containment wars" fought during this period and would become the focus of future developments that would serve only to increase the potency of the submarine - far from that of their days as torpedo-minded warships during World War 2. The USS Ohio was a product of the Cold War, designed with a lethal capability to engage enemy submarines and high-value surface targets through the latest in available systems and technology. She began life as the USS Ohio (SSBN-726) in her original ballistic missile submarine form but would later transition to the new role of guided missile submarine under the marker of "SSGN-726". The Ohio-class was formulated to take over the role of the preceding Benjamin Franklin- and Lafayette-class vessels. The new class also represented the largest submarines ever produced for the American navy and her armament out-weighed even that of the greatest Soviet classes of the time.

The USS Ohio was ordered on July 1st, 1974 with her construction contracted out to General Dynamics Electric Boat - the boat being produced from pre-completed sections. Her keel was laid down on April 10th, 1976 and she was officially launched on April 7th, 1979 - politics and shipyard issues delaying formal trials for some time. The vessel was formally commissioned on November 11th, 1981 (Veterans Day) and she went on to make her home port out of Bangor, Washington in the American northwest, fighting under the official motto of "Always First" (as well as the unofficial "First and Finest"). The USS Ohio represented the lead ship of the Ohio-class of warships which went on to include the USS Henry M. Jackson, the USS Alabama, the USS Alaska, the USS Nevada, the USS Tennessee, the USS Pennsylvania, the USS Florida, the USS Georgia, the USS West Virginia, the USS Kentucky, the USS Maryland, the USS Michigan, the USS Nebraska, the USS Rhode Island, the USS Maine, the USS Wyoming and the USS Louisiana. Only four of these vessels - the USS Ohio, the USS Michigan, the USS Florida and the USS Georgia would be selected for the upcoming SSGN modifications. The USS Louisiana represented the last completed Ohio-class submarine.

Outwardly, the USS Ohio was designed with a conventional shape - essentially a tube with stabilization and control fins as well as the requisite sail. The sail was held ahead of amidships with dive planes emanating from the sail sides. The overall hull design was relatively featureless and sported a well-rounded nose cone and tapered stern. The stern managed the propeller as well as the rudder planes. The USS Ohio displaced at 16,500 long tons when surfaced and 18,450 long tons when submerged. She fielded a 560 foot overall length with a beam measuring 42 feet. Power came from a single S8G PWR series nuclear reactor that fuels 2 x geared turbines. An auxiliary motor provided up to 325 horsepower. The single propeller shaft operated with an output of 60,000 shaft horsepower allowing for surfaced speeds of up to 12 knots and submerged speeds of over 20 knots. Due to her nuclear propulsion suite, the range of the USS Ohio was essentially unlimited, capped only by her ability to keep food stores supplied and crew morale in check. The vessel was crewed by approximately 155 personnel made up of 15 officers and 140 sailors.

The USS Ohio was categorized as an "attack submarine" and, as such, she was armed with an offensive-minded stock consisting of torpedoes and ballistic missiles. Her design was such that she was completed with 4 x 21" (530mm) torpedo launch tubes in the bow section of the hull. This weapon allowed for engagement of enemy surface vessels and submarines alike. The more potent arm of the Ohio weapons suite was her 24 x Trident series submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM) - forming the "first strike" thermonuclear reach of the United States Navy for a time.

Perhaps the oft-overlooked part of the submarine was its powerful array of sensors which allowed the crew to remain undetected and track potential threats in turn. The USS Ohio was fitted with the BQQ-6 series sonar at the bow while a BQR-19 system handled navigation. The BQS-13 was an active sonar array while the TB-16 was a towed sonar array. Altogether, these systems - in conjunction with their well-trained operators - allowed the USS Ohio to be a highly-feared vessel of the deep for some time - a level of respect carried over to this day.

After her SSGN modifications, the USS Ohio replaced her Trident missile stores with Tomahawk cruise missiles - this battery consisting of 22 launch tubes each fitting up to seven cruise missiles for a total of 154 missiles, a massive amount of firepower for a single vessel. The cruise missile could be used to engage surface targets at very long ranges, out of the range of enemy defenses, and the Ohio could even remain submerged during launch.

The USS Ohio formally underwent trails throughout the summer of 1981 before being handed over to the US Navy in October of that same year to which the vessel began formal operations at sea. She was brought up to speed throughout 1982, conducting various voyages and undergoing various tests, particularly of her launch facilities. A refit period in 1993 saw her updated with modern systems to keep the vessel viable and as potent as ever. More patrols then followed until the new millennium which saw several of the Ohio-class boats revised to the guided missile submarine (SSGN) role. Since completion of this modification in 2006, the USS Ohio has remained in active USN service, continuing the role of deterrent the world over.

Submarines like the USS Ohio can also be used in clandestine operations, inserting or extracting special forces elements such as Navy SEALs.

Update July 2012: On July 11, 2012, the USS Ohio (SSGN 726) completed her fourth Major Maintenance Period (MMP) since her 2006 conversion from a ballistic missile submarine to a guided-missile submarine. Ohio entered the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility in mid-April (2012) to which the boat spent 65 days in dry dock (an SSGN requires a MMP for every 12 months of deployment). The Combined efforts of the civilian workmen and the Ohio's Blue and Gold crews accomplished the job. Repair and upgrades during the MMP were on a number of systems including sonar, radar, communication and navigation suites. Also standard checks and repairs were made on the superstructure, and controlling tanks for depth and conditioning units. Additional systems upgraded were water planes and valves used for seawater and ventilation.

USS Ohio has since returned to active duty and is recertified for combat.


OHIO SSGN 726

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

Ohio Class Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine
Keel Laid 10 April 1976 - Launched 7 April 1979

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.

Postmark Type
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Killer Bar Text

Ship Postmark

USCS Postmark
Catalog Illus. O-22

USCS Postmark
Catalog Illus. O-22

Commissioning, cachet by the Donald Wilson. Postmark also seen in BLUE ink.


USS Ohio BB-12 - History

Lloyd’s Casualty Week for December 10 just arrived this morning at the library. Along with the usual information about vessels grounded, stranded, disabled, sunk, captured by pirates, or embroiled in civil unrest or labor disputes, there was an interesting note about the Panama Canal. Lloyd’s reports that for the first time in 20 years, the Canal has been closed down. Heavy rains filled up the Gatun and Alhajuela lakes, making the transit through them unsafe and forcing traffic to a halt. They are expecting a backlog of 60 ships by Friday, and as much as a two-day wait for vessels arriving without a booking.

This is a bit more than a blip in worldwide sea traffic. The Canal handles up to 5% of the world’s seaborne commerce, according to Lloyd’s. The Panama Canal Authority (ACP), through its vice-president Manuel Benitez, says they are “planning to open flood gates to relieve one of the lakes.” Read more


All Iron Shipwrights 1/350 Scale Model Kits Come with a Full Resin Hull, Pieces, Instructions, and Photoetch Parts for Ultimate Historical Accuracy.

Maine class Battleship - 1910

1/350 scale

Complete kit w/ resin parts and photoetch

KIT BY KENNY ROSENBERGER

NOTICE: Model Kit Does Not Come with Display Stand

Recommended Books:

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USS United States was a wooden-hulled, three-masted heavy frigate of the United States Navy and the first of the six original frigates authorized for construction by the Naval Act of 1794. The name "United States" was among ten names submitted to President George Washington by Secretary of War Timothy Pickering in March of 1795 for the frigates that were to be constructed. Joshua Humphreys designed the frigates to be the young Navy's capital ships, and so United States and her sisters were larger and more heavily armed and built than standard frigates of the period. She was built at Humphrey's shipyard in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and launched on 10 May 1797 and immediately began duties with the newly formed United States Navy protecting American merchant shipping during the Quasi-War with France.

USS Independence was a wooden-hulled, three-masted ship, originally a ship of the line and the first to be commissioned by the United States Navy. Originally a 90-gun ship, in 1836 she was cut down by one deck and re-rated as a 54-gun frigate.

USS Vincennes (1826) was a 703-ton Boston-class sloop of war in the United States Navy from 1826 to 1865. During her service, Vincennes patrolled the Pacific, explored the Antarctic, and blockaded the Confederate Gulf coast in the Civil War. Named for the Revolutionary War Battle of Vincennes, she was the first U.S. warship to circumnavigate the globe.

The first USS Raritan was a wooden-hulled, three-masted sailing frigate of the United States Navy built at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, laid down in 1820, but not launched until 13 June 1843, sponsored by Commodore Frederick Engle. She was one of the last sailing frigates of the United States Navy.

USS Columbus was a 90-gun ship of the line in the United States Navy. She was launched on 1 March 1819 by Washington Navy Yard and commissioned on 7 September 1819, Master Commandant J. H. Elton in command.

The first John Adams was originally built in 1799 as a frigate for the United States Navy, converted to a corvette in 1809, and later converted back to a frigate in 1830. Named for President John Adams, she fought in the Quasi-War, the First and Second Barbary Wars, the War of 1812, the Mexican–American War and the American Civil War. At the end of her career, she participated in the Union blockade of South Carolina's ports. She then participated in a historic raid that Harriet Tubman, the former slave and Union operative, organized with Union colonel Montgomery. John Adams led three steam-powered gunboats up the Harbor River to Port Royal. The squadron relied on local black mariners to guide it past mines and fortifications. The squadron freed 750+ slaves and unsettled the Confederacy. Tubman was the first woman in U.S. history to plan and execute an armed expedition.

USS Mississippi, a paddle frigate, was the first ship of the United States Navy to bear that name. She was named for the Mississippi River. Her sister ship was Missouri . Her keel was laid down by the Philadelphia Navy Yard in 1839 built under the personal supervision of Commodore Matthew Perry. She was commissioned on 22 December 1841, with Captain W. D. Salter in command and launched several weeks later.

USS Saratoga, a sloop-of-war, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for the Battle of Saratoga of the American Revolutionary War. Her keel was laid down in the summer of 1841 by the Portsmouth Navy Yard. She was launched on 26 July 1842 and commissioned on 4 January 1843 with Commander Josiah Tattnall in command.

The first USS Levant was a second-class sloop-of-war in the United States Navy.

The Pacific Squadron was part of the United States Navy squadron stationed in the Pacific Ocean in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Initially with no United States ports in the Pacific, they operated out of storeships which provided naval supplies and purchased food and obtained water from local ports of call in the Hawaiian Islands and towns on the Pacific Coast. Throughout the history of the Pacific Squadron, American ships fought against several enemies. Over one-half of the United States Navy would be sent to join the Pacific Squadron during the Mexican–American War. During the American Civil War, the squadron was reduced in size when its vessels were reassigned to Atlantic duty. When the Civil War was over, the squadron was reinforced again until being disbanded just after the turn of the 20th century.

USS Germantown was a United States Navy sloop-of-war in commission for various periods between 1847 and 1860. She saw service in the Mexican–American War in 1847� and during peacetime operated in the Caribbean, in the Atlantic Ocean off Africa and South America, and in East Asia. Scuttled at the outbreak of the American Civil War in 1861, she was captured and refloated by the Confederate States of America and placed in service with the Confederate States Navy as the floating battery CSS Germantown before again being scuttled in 1862.

USS Decatur was a sloop-of-war in the United States Navy during the mid-19th century. She was commissioned to protect American interests in the South Atlantic Ocean, including the interception of ships involved in the African slave trade. Decatur served in both the Mexican–American War and the American Civil War.

The fourth USS Spitfire was a sidewheel gunboat in the United States Navy during the Mexican–American War.

The first USS Jamestown was a sloop-of-war in the United States Navy during the Mexican–American War and the American Civil War.

James Alden Jr. was a rear admiral in the United States Navy. In the Mexican–American War he participated in the captures of Veracruz, Tuxpan, and Tabasco. Fighting on the Union side in the Civil War, he took part in the relief of Fort Pickens, followed by many engagements on the Lower Mississippi, before being promoted captain of USS Brooklyn and assisting in the Union victory in the Battle of Mobile Bay.

USS Albany, the first United States Navy ship of that name, was built in the 1840s for the US Navy. The ship was among the last of the wooden sloops powered by sail and saw extensive service in the Mexican War. Before and after her combat service, Albany conducted surveillance and observation missions throughout the Caribbean. In September 1854, during a journey along the coast of Venezuela, Albany was lost with all hands on 28 or 29 September 1854. Included among the 250 men lost were several sons and grandsons of politically prominent men.

USS Vanderbilt (1862) was a heavy (3,360-ton) passenger steamship obtained by the Union Navy during the second year of the American Civil War and utilized as a cruiser.

USS Fredonia (1845) was an 800-ton bark that served the U.S. Navy as a transport and as a storeship. After several voyages to California by way of Cape Horn, she became the station warehouse in Arica, Chile, where she was destroyed by an earthquake.

The first USS Hecla was a bomb brig that served in the United States Navy from 1846 to 1848, seeing service in the Mexican War.

USS Petrita was a steamer that served in the United States Navy from 1846 to 1848. She saw service in the Mexican War.



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