Revolutionary War - Timeline, Facts and Battles

Revolutionary War - Timeline, Facts and Battles


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The Revolutionary War (1775-83), also known as the American Revolution, arose from growing tensions between residents of Great Britain’s 13 North American colonies and the colonial government, which represented the British crown. Skirmishes between British troops and colonial militiamen in Lexington and Concord in April 1775 kicked off the armed conflict, and by the following summer, the rebels were waging a full-scale war for their independence. France entered the American Revolution on the side of the colonists in 1778, turning what had essentially been a civil war into an international conflict. After French assistance helped the Continental Army force the British surrender at Yorktown, Virginia, in 1781, the Americans had effectively won their independence, though fighting would not formally end until 1783.

Causes of the Revolutionary War

For more than a decade before the outbreak of the American Revolution in 1775, tensions had been building between colonists and the British authorities.

The French and Indian War, or Seven Years’ War (1756-1763), brought new territories under the power of the crown, but the expensive conflict lead to new and unpopular taxes. Attempts by the British government to raise revenue by taxing the colonies (notably the Stamp Act of 1765, the Townshend Acts of 1767 and the Tea Act of 1773) met with heated protest among many colonists, who resented their lack of representation in Parliament and demanded the same rights as other British subjects.

Colonial resistance led to violence in 1770, when British soldiers opened fire on a mob of colonists, killing five men in what was known as the Boston Massacre. After December 1773, when a band of Bostonians dressed as Mohawk Indians boarded British ships and dumped 342 chests of tea into Boston Harbor during the Boston Tea Party, an outraged Parliament passed a series of measures (known as the Intolerable, or Coercive Acts) designed to reassert imperial authority in Massachusetts.

In response, a group of colonial delegates (including George Washington of Virginia, John and Samuel Adams of Massachusetts, Patrick Henry of Virginia and John Jay of New York) met in Philadelphia in September 1774 to give voice to their grievances against the British crown. This First Continental Congress did not go so far as to demand independence from Britain, but it denounced taxation without representation, as well as the maintenance of the British army in the colonies without their consent. It issued a declaration of the rights due every citizen, including life, liberty, property, assembly and trial by jury. The Continental Congress voted to meet again in May 1775 to consider further action, but by that time violence had already broken out.

On the night of April 18, 1775, hundreds of British troops marched from Boston to nearby Concord, Massachusetts in order to seize an arms cache. Paul Revere and other riders sounded the alarm, and colonial militiamen began mobilizing to intercept the Redcoats. On April 19, local militiamen clashed with British soldiers in the Battles of Lexington and Concord in Massachusetts, marking the “shot heard round the world” that signified the start of the Revolutionary War.

Declaring Independence (1775-76)

When the Second Continental Congress convened in Philadelphia, delegates–including new additions Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson–voted to form a Continental Army, with Washington as its commander in chief. On June 17, in the Revolution’s first major battle, colonial forces inflicted heavy casualties on the British regiment of General William Howe at Breed’s Hill in Boston. The engagement, known as the Battle of Bunker Hill, ended in British victory, but lent encouragement to the revolutionary cause.

Throughout that fall and winter, Washington’s forces struggled to keep the British contained in Boston, but artillery captured at Fort Ticonderoga in New York helped shift the balance of that struggle in late winter. The British evacuated the city in March 1776, with Howe and his men retreating to Canada to prepare a major invasion of New York.

By June 1776, with the Revolutionary War in full swing, a growing majority of the colonists had come to favor independence from Britain. On July 4, the Continental Congress voted to adopt the Declaration of Independence, drafted by a five-man committee including Franklin and John Adams but written mainly by Jefferson. That same month, determined to crush the rebellion, the British government sent a large fleet, along with more than 34,000 troops to New York. In August, Howe’s Redcoats routed the Continental Army on Long Island; Washington was forced to evacuate his troops from New York City by September. Pushed across the Delaware River, Washington fought back with a surprise attack in Trenton, New Jersey, on Christmas night and won another victory at Princeton to revive the rebels’ flagging hopes before making winter quarters at Morristown.

Saratoga: Revolutionary War Turning Point (1777-78)

British strategy in 1777 involved two main prongs of attack aimed at separating New England (where the rebellion enjoyed the most popular support) from the other colonies. To that end, General John Burgoyne’s army marched south from Canada toward a planned meeting with Howe’s forces on the Hudson River. Burgoyne’s men dealt a devastating loss to the Americans in July by retaking Fort Ticonderoga, while Howe decided to move his troops southward from New York to confront Washington’s army near the Chesapeake Bay. The British defeated the Americans at Brandywine Creek, Pennsylvania, on September 11 and entered Philadelphia on September 25. Washington rebounded to strike Germantown in early October before withdrawing to winter quarters near Valley Forge.

Howe’s move had left Burgoyne’s army exposed near Saratoga, New York, and the British suffered the consequences of this on September 19, when an American force under General Horatio Gates defeated them at Freeman’s Farm in the first Battle of Saratoga. After suffering another defeat on October 7 at Bemis Heights (the Second Battle of Saratoga), Burgoyne surrendered his remaining forces on October 17. The American victory Saratoga would prove to be a turning point of the American Revolution, as it prompted France (which had been secretly aiding the rebels since 1776) to enter the war openly on the American side, though it would not formally declare war on Great Britain until June 1778. The American Revolution, which had begun as a civil conflict between Britain and its colonies, had become a world war.

Stalemate in the North, Battle in the South (1778-81)

During the long, hard winter at Valley Forge, Washington’s troops benefited from the training and discipline of the Prussian military officer Baron Friedrich von Steuben (sent by the French) and the leadership of the French aristocrat Marquis de Lafayette. On June 28, 1778, as British forces under Sir Henry Clinton (who had replaced Howe as supreme commander) attempted to withdraw from Philadelphia to New York, Washington’s army attacked them near Monmouth, New Jersey. The battle effectively ended in a draw, as the Americans held their ground, but Clinton was able to get his army and supplies safely to New York. On July 8, a French fleet commanded by the Comte d’Estaing arrived off the Atlantic coast, ready to do battle with the British. A joint attack on the British at Newport, Rhode Island, in late July failed, and for the most part the war settled into a stalemate phase in the North.

The Americans suffered a number of setbacks from 1779 to 1781, including the defection of General Benedict Arnold to the British and the first serious mutinies within the Continental Army. In the South, the British occupied Georgia by early 1779 and captured Charleston, South Carolina in May 1780. British forces under Lord Charles Cornwallis then began an offensive in the region, crushing Gates’ American troops at Camden in mid-August, though the Americans scored a victory over Loyalist forces at King’s Mountain in early October. Nathanael Green replaced Gates as the American commander in the South that December. Under Green’s command, General Daniel Morgan scored a victory against a British force led by Colonel Banastre Tarleton at Cowpens, South Carolina, on January 17, 1781.

Revolutionary War Draws to a Close (1781-83)

By the fall of 1781, Greene’s American forces had managed to force Cornwallis and his men to withdraw to Virginia’s Yorktown peninsula, near where the York River empties into Chesapeake Bay. Supported by a French army commanded by General Jean Baptiste de Rochambeau, Washington moved against Yorktown with a total of around 14,000 soldiers, while a fleet of 36 French warships offshore prevented British reinforcement or evacuation. Trapped and overpowered, Cornwallis was forced to surrender his entire army on October 19. Claiming illness, the British general sent his deputy, Charles O’Hara, to surrender; after O’Hara approached Rochambeau to surrender his sword (the Frenchman deferred to Washington), Washington gave the nod to his own deputy, Benjamin Lincoln, who accepted it.

Though the movement for American independence effectively triumphed at the Battle of Yorktown, contemporary observers did not see that as the decisive victory yet. British forces remained stationed around Charleston, and the powerful main army still resided in New York. Though neither side would take decisive action over the better part of the next two years, the British removal of their troops from Charleston and Savannah in late 1782 finally pointed to the end of the conflict. British and American negotiators in Paris signed preliminary peace terms in Paris late that November, and on September 3, 1783, Great Britain formally recognized the independence of the United States in the Treaty of Paris. At the same time, Britain signed separate peace treaties with France and Spain (which had entered the conflict in 1779), bringing the American Revolution to a close after eight long years.

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Revolutionary War Timeline

Daniel Morgan involved in an attempt to take Quebec City. Morgan taken prisoner.

North Carolina militia defeated Loyalist Scots inflicting heavy casualties. On June 2, 1926, Congress recognized the importance of Moore's Creek by creating Moore's Creek National Battlefield.

British Navy moved to Halifax, NS, Canada and Washington’s Army occupied Boston.

Patriot attempt to take British position failed.

British naval attack failed when the palmetto logs held against the bombardment. On September 7, 1960, Congress recognized the importance of the battle on Sullivan's Island by creating Fort Moultrie National Monument as part of FortSumpterNational Monument.

Incited by British royal agents, the Cherokee attacked along the entire southern frontier.

Patriots defended against attack by Indians and Tories dressed as Indians.

Ambushed by Cherokees, Patriot forces saved by a mounted charge.

Cherokees defeated by Andrew Pickens.

200 Cherokees attacked Andrew Pickens and 25 militia. From a circle, firing in turn, the patriots held off attackers until a rescue force arrived

Col. Williamson and Andrew Pickens defeated large Cherokee war party and burned the Indian town, Tamassy.

George Washington’s army defeated but escaped by night in the fog.

Nathanael Greene involved in engagement against British and Hessians. British driven back to their lines.

Col. Williamson’s patriots were attacked by Cherokees south of (now) Franklin, NC in a gorge known as the Black Hole. Americans eventually cleared the pass.

With makeshift boats on Lake Champlain, Benedict Arnold engaged a British squadron. Arnold was defeated but delayed the British until it was too close to winter to continue their campaign.

British and Hessians (4,000) attacked Americans (1,600) and defeated them but British casualties (300) exceeded the Americans (200).

American commander surrendered FortWashington to the Hessians.

Lord Cornwallis captured Fort Lee. Nathanael Greene abandoned the position.

George Washington crossed the Delaware River and surprised Hessian brigade and defeated it.

Dr. Christine Swager researched this timeline and based it on Lumpkin, Henry. From Savannahto Yorktown: The American Revolution in the South. New York, NY: Paragon House. 1981.

Princeton, NJ 3 Jan. 1777 Washington defeated British brigade.
Treaty of DeWitt’s Corner, SC 20 May 1777 Cherokees sued for peace and lost most of their land east of the mountains.
Oriskany, NY 6 Aug. 1777 British column with Iroquois warriors attack from Oswego. Rescue troops ambushed.
Battle of Bennington, VT 16 Aug. 1777 British General John Burgoyne detached Hessians, British regulars, Loyalists and Iroquois against Bennington. American militia attacked and defeated the British.
Fort Stanwix, NY 23 Aug. 1777 Benedict Arnold intended to siege the fort but the Indians and Loyalists deserted and the British retired. On August 25, 1935, Congress recognized the importance of Fort Stanwix by creating Fort Stanwix National Monument.
Brandywine, PA 11 Sept. 1777 Americans under George Washington were defeated but retreated in good order.
Saratoga, NY 19 Sept. –17 Oct. 1777 General John Burgoyne surrendered his British Army to American Maj. Gen. Horatio Gates. On June 1, 1938, Congress recognized the importance of Saratoga by creating Saratoga National Historical Park.
Paoli, PA. 21 Sept. 1777 British troops attack with bayonets and surprised Americans. Americans called it the “Paoli Massacre.”
Germantown, PA. 4 Oct. 1777 4 Oct. 1777 American attack on British positions failed.
Valley Forge, PA Winter 1777-78 Winter camp at Valley Forge under terrible conditions. On July 4, 1976, Congress recognized the importance of Valley Forge by creating Valley Forge National Historical Park.
Morristown, NJ Winter 1777 Sheltered the main encampments of the American Continental Army and served as the winter quarters of its commander-in-chief, General George Washington. On March 2, 1933, Congress recognized the importance of Morristown by creating Morristown National Historical Park.

Dr. Christine Swager researched this timeline and based it on Lumpkin, Henry. From Savannah to Yorktown: The American Revolution in the South. New York, NY: Paragon House. 1981.

6 February 1778 France signed a treaty with the Continental Congress which would provide troops, ships and supplies to America.
Philadelphia, PA 18 June 1778 British abandoned Philadelphia and moved to New York.
Monmouth Court House, NJ 28 June 1778 American troops held the field but it was not a clear-cut victory. Dr. Lumpkin writes that this “was the last major set battle between American and British regular forces in the northern theatre of the war.”
Kaskaskia, IL 4 July 1778 Town captured by Col. George Rogers Clark.
Savannah, GA. 29 Dec. 1778 The first event of the Southern Campaign.
Port Royal Island, SC 3 Feb. 1779 Maj. Gen. Moultrie defeated British detachment.
Kettle Creek, GA 14 Feb. 1779 Andrew Pickens and Elijah Clarke and their Georgia and Carolina militia defeated North Carolina Loyalist militia who were travelling to Augusta to joint the British forces.
Vincennes, IN 24 Feb. 1779 Loyalists and Indians recaptured Vincennes, but George Rogers Clark forced them to retreat. On July 23, 1966, Congress recognized the importance of Vincennes by creating George Rogers Clark National Historical Park.
Brier Creek, GA 3 Mar. 1779 British Lt.Col. Prevost defeated Americans under Gen. John Ashe.
Siege of Charleston, SC 11-13 May 1779 Maj. Gen. A. Prevost had to break his siege when American forces under Maj.Gen.Lincoln approached.
Stono River, SC 20 June 1779 Maj. Gen. Lincoln engaged a British rear guard. Battle indecisive but many casualties.
Stony Point, NY 16 July 1779 16 July 1779 American attacked with bayonets only. Extensive British casualties.
Newtown, NY 29 Aug. 1779 29 Aug. 1779 After 2 terrible massacres, American forces moved into Indian territory and burned villages. Iroquois and Seneca power was diminished although they remained hostile.
Castine, ME July-Aug. 1779 American attempt to dislodge British along the Penobscot River failed.
Paulus Hook, NJ 19 Aug. 1779 Successful American surprise attack on British outpost.
Savannah,GA 16 Sept.-19 Oct 1779 American Army under Maj. Gen. Lincoln failed to dislodge British from Savannah.
Morristown, NJ Winter 1779- 1780 Sheltered the main encampments of the American Continental Army and served as the winter quarters of its commander-in-chief, General George Washington. On March 2, 1933, Congress recognized the importance of Morristown by creating Morristown National Historical Park.

Dr. Christine Swager researched this timeline and based it on Lumpkin, Henry. From Savannah to Yorktown: The American Revolution in the South. New York, NY: Paragon House. 1981.

Siege of Charleston, SC 29 Mar –12 May 1780 Maj. Gen. Lincoln surrendered the town and his entire army.
Monck’s Corner, SC 14 April 1780 Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton scattered American militia
Lenud’s Ferry, SC 6 May 1780 Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton dispersed American cavalry.
Waxhaws, SC 29 May 1780 Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton and his Loyalist Legion bayoneted 113 Continental soldiers of Col. Buford’s Virginia unit. Known as Buford’s Massacre.
5 June 1780 Lord Cornwallis assumed command of the British Army in the South.
Ramsour’s Mill, NC 20 June 1780 Patriot forces defeated Loyalist forces, ultimately resulting in loss of Loyalist support in North Carolina.
Williamson’s Plantation, SC 12 July 1780 Patriot forces of Thomas Sumter’s command defeated Loyalist Christian Huck and his forces. Huck was killed.
Cedar Springs, SC 12 July 1780 Spartan regiment of South Carolina Patriots ambushed Loyalist attacking party.
Gowen’s Old Fort, SC 13 July 1780 Georgia Patriots attacked Loyalist camp and defeated them.
25 July 1780 General Horatio Gates assumed command of Southern Continental Army.
Rocky Mount, SC 30 July 1780 Thomas Sumter’s troops attacked British post but were forced to withdraw.
Hanging Rock 1, SC 30 July 1780 North Carolina Royalists were attacked by North Carolina Patriots who succeeded in capturing weapons and horses.
Hanging Rock 2, SC 6 Aug. 1780 Thomas Sumter attacked British post and inflicted heavy casualties but was forced to retreat.
Kershaw County, SC 15 Aug 1780 Patriot militia attacked and captured Carey’s Fort and took a supply convoy from Ninety-Six.
Battle of Camden, SC 16 Aug 1780 Maj. Gen. Horatio Gates and the Continental Army were badly defeated by Lord Cornwallis and the British forces.
Fishing Creek, SC 18 Aug.1780 Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton surprised Thomas Sumter’s command and defeated it.
Musgrove Mill, SC 18 Aug. 1780 Frontier riflemen and militiamen lured the British into an ambush and defeated them.
Nelson’s Ferry, SC 25 Aug. 1780 Francis Marion attacked British convoy and released 150 Americans who had been taken prisoner at the Battle of Camden.
Blue Savannah, SC 4 Sept. 1780 Francis Marion led British Loyalists into an ambush and defeated them.
McKay’s Trading Post, GA. 14-18 Sept. 1780 Elijah Clarke attacked the post but was driven off when British relief column arrived. American prisoners taken were hanged or turned over to the Cherokees to be tortured and killed.
Wahab’s Plantation, NC 21 Sept. 1780 Lt. Col. Davie attacked Banastre Tarleton and captured horses and equipment.
Charlotte, NC 26 Sept. 1780 Lt. Col. Davie and 150 American soldiers ambushed Tarleton’s Legion at Charlotte but were driven off by reinforcements.
Black Mingo, SC 28-29 Sept. 1780 Francis Marion attacked a Loyalist encampment and drove them into the swamp.
Kings Mountain, SC 7 Oct. 1780 Frontier militia from North Carolina, Virginia, Georgia and South Carolina surrounded Patrick Ferguson’s force at Kings Mountain and defeated them. This was a decisive victory for the Patriots and a turning point in the Revolutionary War. On March 3, 1931, Congress recognized the importance of Kings Mountain by creating Kings Mountain National Military Park.
Tearcoat Swamp, SC 25 Oct. 1780 Francis Marion routed a Loyalist force under Tynes.
Fish Dam Ford, SC 9 Nov. 1780 A search and destroy mission by the British was intended to murder Thomas Sumter. A night attack failed and the British retreated leaving their wounded.
Blackstocks, SC 20 Nov. 1780 Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton pushed his cavalry in pursuit of Thomas Sumter and attacked. The British were beaten back with heavy casualties.
2 Dec. 1780 A search and destroy mission by the British was intended to murder Thomas Sumter. A night attack failed and the British retreated leaving their wounded.
Long Cane, SC 12 Dec. 1780 Attack by Americans against a British force four times their number resulted in Georgia militia leader, Elijah Clarke, sustaining serious wounds.
Halfway Swamp & Singleton’s Mill SC 12 Dec. 1780 Francis Marion engaged large Loyalist group which retreated. An attempt to trap the Loyalists at Singleton’s Mill failed when it was discovered that the Singleton family had smallpox.
Hammond’s Store, SC 30 Dec. 1780 Brig. Gen. Daniel Morgan sent Col. William Washington with Continental Dragons and mounted militia to attack Georgia Loyalists. The Loyalists suffered 150 casualties.

Dr. Christine Swager researched this timeline and based it on Lumpkin, Henry. From Savannah to Yorktown: The American Revolution in the South. New York, NY: Paragon House. 1981.


Events that led up to the war:

The Stamp Act (March 22, 1765) - Britain sets a tax that requires a stamp on all public documents like newspapers or legal documents. The colonists did not like having this tax placed on them. This led to unrest in the colonies and the Stamp Act Congress (October 1765).

The Boston Massacre (March 5, 1770 - 5 Boston colonists are shot by British troops.


The Destruction of Tea at Boston Harbor by Nathaniel Currier

The Boston Tea Party (Dec. 16, 1773) - Angry with a new tax on tea, some Boston colonists calling themselves the Sons of Liberty board British ships and dump crates of tea into the Boston Harbor.

The First Continental Congress Meets (Sept. 1774) - Representatives from the colonies get together to unite and oppose British taxes.


Paul Revere's Midnight Ride
Source: National Archives and Records Administration.

Revolutionary War - Timeline, Facts and Battles - HISTORY

February 14, 1779 - Battle of Kettle Creek, Georgia
Troops: Continental Army/Militia 600-700 British 320-420.
Casualties (Killed/Wounded/Missing): Continental Army 115-145, including captured British 21-32.
Patriot militia defeat a Loyalist militia, proving that British allied forces could not hold the backcountry of Georgia during early days of the Southern strategy.

February 23-25, 1779 - Siege of Fort Vincennes (Sackville), Indiana
Troops: Continental Army 172 British 290, including Indian forces.
Casualties: Continental Army 0 British/Allies 20, 79 captured.
British surrender the fort and control of much of the Illinois territory after a daring winter march by forces of George Rogers Clark.

March 3, 1779 - Battle of Brier Creek, Georgia
Troops: Continental Army/Militia 1,100 British 900.
Casualties: Continental Army 150, 227 captured British 16.
British decoy American militia forces and engage in a surprise attack in eastern Georgia, reversing the gains from the Battle of Kettle Creek, allowing the British to dominate the region and prepare for further action.

June 20, 1779 - Battle of Stono Ferry, South Carolina
Troops: Continental Army/Militia 1,500 British 900.
Casualties: Continental Army/Militia 302 British 120.
As British retreat after an excursion from their base in Savannah, they are attacked by American forces at Stono Ferry. British vicitory after initial success by Patriot militia is thwarted and patriots are forced to withdraw.

June 24, 1779 - Siege of Gibraltar
Troops: France/Spain 13,749 British 5,382.
Casualties: France/Spain NA British NA.
Opening day of the siege of Gibraltar that would last over three years, affecting the supply and attention of the British forces in the American Revolution. Spanish and French fleets attack the British by sea and forts are built on land as bases to attack the British by land.

July 5-14, 1779 - Tryon's Raid 1779, Connecticutt Troops: Continental Army/Militia 1,000 (New Haven), NA (Fairfield), 50 (Norwalk) British 2,600. Casualties: Continental Army 38, 12 captured (New Haven) British 148. Soldiers on Royal Navy ships raid towns of New Haven, Fairfield, Norwalk with minimal militia resistance in attempt to draw Washington's main body of troops, watching British movement around New York City, into battle. Washington resisted.

July 16, 1779 - Battle of Stony Point, New York
Troops: Continental Army 1,500 British 750.
Casualties: Continental Army 98 British 78 plus 546 captured.
Select group of Continental Army troops under General Wayne attack a British outpost ten miles north of New York City. Huge victory for Americans and boost for morale, although fort was abandoned not long after capture. Wayne issued medal by Congress, one of few issued in the American Revolution.

June 18 to September 27, 1779 - Sullivan/Clinton Expedition
Troops: Continental Army 4,000 British/Allies NA.
Casualties: Continental Army 25 plus British/Allies NA.
General Sullivan (from Easton, Pa.) and General Clinton (from Cooperstown, NY) are ordered by Washington to destroy Indian villages supporting British war efforts. Forty villages are destroyed in Susquehanna Valley of New York from base in Tioga.

July 24 to August 14, 1779 - Penobscot Expedition, Maine
Troops: Continental Army 1,000 plus 44 ships British 700, 10 warships.
Casualties: Continental Army 474, including captured, all ships lost British 60, 26 captured.
Worst defeat by American Navy until Pearl Harbor. Attempt by ground expeditionary force of American soldiers, including Paul Revere to retake coast of Maine from British who had siezed it one month earlier. Siege of Fort George fails when British fleet arrives from New York, causing the destruction of all American ships by capture or self-destruction. American troops forces to flee back to Boston on foot.

September 7, 1779 - Capture of Fort Bute, West Florida (Louisiana)
Troops: Spain 1,430 British 23.
Casualties: Spain 0 British 1, 16 captured.
Spain battles on side of American Revolution in their first action, capturing the British frontier outpost Fort Bute. Spain officially entered the war on the side of the Americans on May 8, 1779.

September 12-21, 1779 - Battle of Fort New Richmond, West Florida (Louisiana)
Troops: Spain 798 British 550.
Casualties: Spain 3 (1 killed, 2 wounded) British 36 (1 killed, 5 wounded, 30 died in captivity), 375 captured.
Spanish troops continue toward the capture of Baton Rouge at the siege of Fort New Richmond. Shelling of the fort on the ninth day causes British commander to surrender. Battle places control of the lower Mississippi River in Spanish control.

September 16 to October 20, 1779 - Siege of Savannah (Second Battle), Georgia
Troops: Continental Army/Allies 5,050, 42 ships British 3,200.
Casualties: Continental Army/Allies 828, captured 120 British 155.
Attempt by Continental forces and French allies to retake Savannah after British takeover in 1778 fails during land assault. Siege abandoned.

Note: Photo above: Lithograph named Mrs. Murray's strategy in occupation of American cities by British redcoats during American Revolution. Year of 1779 saw British in control of New York City with Washington's main troops engaged in a wait and see approach to battle. Lithograph by E. Percy Moran, 1908. Courtesy Library of Congress. Casualty and troop strength numbers from Wikipedia Commons via various sources.


Revolutionary Battles

Revolutionary Battles
The Revolutionary Battles covers the conflicts and battles fought during the American War of Independence. The American Revolutionary Battles covers the revolution of the American Colonies against Great Britain from 1775 to 1783.

The people, important events and key dates of the American Revolutionary Battles in chronological order. Fast facts about American history and the American Revolutionary Battles.

Major Revolutionary Battles
The following list of the major conflicts and Revolutionary Battles that took place during the during the Revolutionary War.

  • April 19, 1775: Lexington - the first battle of the American Revolutionary War and the Battle of Concord
  • May 10, 1775: Battle of Fort Ticonderoga
  • June 17, 1775: Battle of Bunker Hill
  • January 17, 1781: Battle of Cowpens
  • June 27-28, 1778: Battle of Monmouth
  • October 7, 1777: Battle of Saratoga
  • October 19, 1781: The Siege of Yorktown - the British surrender ended the American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary Battles
This article about the American Revolutionary Battles details the history, facts and information about the Revolutionary War with the important events, conflicts, battles, key dates and years via our Revolutionary Battles Timeline. We have also provided information about the Advantages of the British and the Advantages of the Americans in fighting the Revolutionary War and the associated conflicts and Revolutionary Battles. Not all of the American colonists were united in the War with the British. Many of the wealthy, well-educated colonists had strong links with the mother country and many of these American colonists were opposed to independence. The opponents of the American Revolutionary War were strongest in the Carolinas, and were weakest in New England.

Revolutionary Battles - History Timeline and Chart of Revolutionary Battles
Discover interesting information and facts about the history of the US via the Revolutionary Battles Timeline and chart. The conflicts and Battles that occurred during the 1775 Revolutionary Battles include the the first battle of the Revolutionary War at Lexington, Concord and the Battle of Bunker Hill. Over 30,000 Hessian soldiers were hired to fight against the American rebels during the Revolutionary War and fought during many important battles.

Revolution Battles Timeline

Revolutionary Battles - History Timeline and Chart of Revolutionary Battles
Important events in history in a fast date order format via the Revolutionary Battles containing details of famous events and famous people who feature strongly in the history of America in this comprehensive Revolutionary War Timeline. The Revolutionary Battles provides the sequence of major events in American history - the American War of Independence.

  • There were six times as many people in the British Isles as there were in the American colonies
  • The British had a well established standing army - the Americans did not
  • The British had a well established navy - the Americans did not
  • The British had quantities of powder, guns, and clothing - the Americans did not
  • America was a long way from and it was very difficult and costly for the British to send additional troops to America, and it was very difficult to feed the soldiers when they were fighting in America
  • The Americans usually fought on the defensive and the country over which the armies fought was well known and made for defence.
  • The Americans had many great leaders and soldiers including Washington, Greene, Arnold, Morgan, and Wayne

A comprehensive Revolutionary Battles Timeline that provides a chronological list detailing the battles and conflicts in date order that were fought against the British in the American War of Independence. The Revolutionary Battles timeline is the fastest and easiest way to gain a full overview of the history of America and the Revolutionary Battles of the American War of Independence.


  • When the British government became involved, members of the colonies worried that they would lose their freedom and be persecuted.
  • Members of the colonies didn’t agree with paying taxes to Britain. This lead to their motto ‘No Taxation Without Representation.’
  • The colonies didn’t like the laws imposed on them by Britain, including the Sugar Act, the Tea Act, and the Stamp Act.
  • Members of the colonies were constantly being punished by the British for rioting, which made them even angrier.
  • The Boston Port Act forced the colonies to pay for the tea they had destroyed, in what came to be called the Boston Tea Party, before the port would be reopened, which angered the locals and scaring others. was imposed on the American colonies by the British government. The Act intended to subsidize the struggling East India Company, which was very important for the British economy, and the Tea Act would raise money from the 13 colonies for it.
  • The people of the colonies did not agree with the unfair taxes they had to pay and, as a result, destroyed over £90,000 worth of tea in the Boston Tea Party of 16 December 1773. The American protesters boarded three trade ships in the Boston Harbor and threw 342 wooden chests of tea into the water. In today’s money, that tea would have been worth roughly a million dollars. was another tax imposed on the American colonies by the British in 1775. The tax covered printed materials, specifically newspapers, magazines, and any legal documents.
  • It was named The Stamp Act because, when these materials were purchased, they were given an official stamp (pictured above) to show that the buyer had paid the new tax. started because the local people were taunting British soldiers – shouting and threatening them – because they did not agree with the British Army having a place in their city.
  • During the Boston Massacre, British soldiers stationed in Boston killed five men and injured six others. Two of the injured men later died because of their wounds.
  • The five men who died were Crispus Attucks, Samuel Gray, James Caldwell, Samuel Maverick, and Patrick Carr. Crispus Attucks is thought to be the first American casualty of the American Revolution.
  • All eight soldiers involved in the Boston Massacre were arrested. Six of them were released, and two were charged with manslaughter. Their punishment was ‘branding of the thumb’.
  • The British called the massacre the ‘Incident on King Street’.
  • The American Revolution, also known as the Revolutionary War, officially began in 1775.
  • British soldiers and American patriots started the war with battles at Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts.
  • Colonists in America wanted independence from England.
  • The colonies had no central government at the beginning of the war, so delegates from all of the colonies were sent to form the first Continental Congress. , a former military officer and wealthy Virginian, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army.
  • Members of the Continental Congress wrote a letter to King George of England outlining their complaints and declaring their independence from England.
  • On July 4, 1776, the Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence, in which the colonies declared their independence from England.
  • On October 17, 1777, the Battles of Saratoga brought a huge victory for the Americans after the defeat and surrender of General John Burgoyne.
  • The winter of 1777 to 1778 became a huge challenge for General Washington as they spent winter training at Valley Forge.
  • By February 16, 1778, France honored the Treaty of Alliance with America and recognized them as an independent country from Britain.
  • The official government of the United States was defined through the Articles of Confederation on March 2, 1781.
  • The last major battle of the American Revolutionary War took place at the Battle of Yorktown. General Cornwallis surrendered, marking the unofficial end of the war.
  • The war ended in 1783, and the United States of America was born. By April 9, 1784, King George III ratified the treaty.

Battle of Long Island

U.S. Army Artillery Retreat from Long Island 1776

Following the British loss of Boston to rebel forces, the focus of fighting shifted to the area of New York. General George Washington sought to defend New York from capture by British forces but lost what became known as the Battle of Long Island (alternately known as the Battle of Brooklyn Heights). It was the first major defeat following the declartion of Independece by the Continential Congress. Washington and his army managed to evacuate from Brooklyn to Manhattan and escape destruction by the British but the battles fought in Manhattan also ended in defeat for American forces. Washington was forced to widthdraw entirely from New York City into New Jersey. New York City remained under British occupation for the remainder of the war.


Notable Events of 1778

January 10, 1778 - USS Bonhomme Richard

John Paul Jones receives an old French Vessel. It is renamed The Bonhomme Richard.

February 6, 1778 - The Alliance With France

After the Battle of Saratoga, Congress decided to seek French support in the war. They sent Benjamin Franklin, who could speak French, to meet with King Louis XVI and the French foreign minister.

France wanted to get revenge on Britain for the defeat in the French and Indian War. They also wanted to ensure that Britain and America don't resolve their differences.

In February 1778, France and America signed a treaty which put France at war with Britain. This treaty was the first document to officially recognize America as an independent state.

December 9, 1778 - Illinois Annexed

The Colony of Virginia annexes all territory captured by George Rodgers Clark, naming it Illinois.


Revolutionary War Timeline

This article on Revolutionary War Timeline provides a full history timeline detailing the facts and information about famous people, important events and key dates of the American Revolutionary War in chronological order. Fast facts about American history via the Revolutionary War Timeline. Important events in a fast date order format via the Revolutionary War Timeline.

History of the Battles, Conflicts and Soldiers of the American Revolution War

Revolutionary War Timeline: The American Revolutionary War, the soldiers and the famous battles of the conflict

Revolutionary War Timeline
The Revolutionary War Timeline covers the conflicts and battles fought during the American War of Independence. The American Revolutionary War Timeline covers the revolution of the American Colonies against Great Britain from 1775 to 1783.

Revolutionary War Timeline - Major Battles
The following list of conflicts and battles include some of the most important events during the Revolutionary War.

  • April 19, 1775: Lexington - the first battle of the American Revolutionary War and the Battle of Concord
  • May 10, 1775: Battle of Fort Ticonderoga, American revolutionary troops capture Fort Ticonderoga from the British
  • June 17, 1775: Battle of Bunker Hill - the first important battle of the Revolutionary War, fought at Breed's Hill
  • January 17, 1781: Battle of Cowpens, Daniel Morgan defeated the British
  • June 27-28, 1778: Battle of Monmouth
  • October 7, 1777: Battle of Saratoga
  • October 19, 1781: The Siege of Yorktown - the British under Cornwallis surrendered after a siege of 3 weeks by American and French troops the surrender ended the American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary War Timeline - History Timeline
Discover interesting information and facts about the history of the US via the Revolutionary War Timeline. This article provides a Revolutionary War Timeline detailing the history, facts and information about the Revolutionary War with famous people, important events, conflicts, battles and key dates via this comprehensive Revolutionary War Timeline. Important events in history in a fast date order format via the Revolutionary War Timeline containing details of famous events and famous people who feature strongly in the history of America in this comprehensive Revolutionary War Timeline. The Revolutionary War Timeline provides the sequence of major events in American history - the American War of Independence.

Revolutionary War Timeline - History Timeline for the Year of 1775
The Revolutionary War Timeline is divided into separate sections for easy reference. The Revolutionary War Timeline begins with the Provincial Congress in Massachusetts ordering 13,600 American soldiers to be mobilized and begin a year long siege of Boston. The conflicts and Battles that occurred during the 1775 Revolutionary War Timeline include the the first battle of the Revolution War at the Battle of Lexington, Battle of Concord and the Battle of Bunker Hill.

Revolutionary War Timeline 1775 - American History Timeline

Revolutionary War Timeline - History Timeline for the Year of 1776
The Revolutionary War Timeline is divided into separate sections for easy reference. The conflicts and Battles that occurred during the 1776 Revolutionary War Timeline include the Battle of Long Island, the Battle of White Plains and the Battle of Trenton. The American Navy is defeated on Lake Champlain

Revolutionary War Timeline 1776 - American History Timeline

Revolutionary War Timeline - History Timeline for the Year of 1777
The Revolutionary War Timeline is divided into separate sections for easy reference. The conflicts and Battles that occurred during the 1777 Revolutionary War Timeline include the Battle of Princeton, Battle of Bennington, Battle of Brandywine and the Battles of Saratoga.

Revolutionary War Timeline 1777 - American History Timeline

Revolutionary War Timeline - History Timeline for the Year of 1778
The Revolutionary War Timeline is divided into separate sections for easy reference. The conflicts and Battles that occurred during the 1778 Revolutionary War Timeline include the Battle of Monmouth and the British forces capture Savannah and Augusta at the Siege of Savannah.

Revolutionary War Timeline 1778 - American History Timeline

Revolutionary War Timeline - History Timeline for the Year of 1779
The Revolutionary War Timeline is divided into separate sections for easy reference. The conflicts and Battles that occurred during the 1779 Revolutionary War Timeline include The Siege of Savannah.

Revolutionary War Timeline - History Timeline for the Year of 1780
The Revolutionary War Timeline is divided into separate sections for easy reference. The conflicts and Battles that occurred during the 1780 Revolutionary War Timeline include the The Battle of Camden and the Siege of Charleston.

Revolutionary War Timeline 1780 - American History Timeline

Revolutionary War Timeline - History Timeline for the Year of 1781
The Revolutionary War Timeline is divided into separate sections for easy reference. The conflicts and Battles that occurred during the 1781 Revolutionary War Timeline include the Battle of Cowpens, Battle of Guilford Courthouse and the Battle of Yorktown.

Revolutionary War Timeline 1781 - American History Timeline

Revolutionary War Timeline - History Timeline for the Year of 1782
The Revolutionary War Timeline is divided into separate sections for easy reference. The conflicts and Battles that occurred during the 1782 Revolutionary War Timeline include the Battle at Combahee River.

Revolutionary War Timeline - History Timeline for the Year of 1783
The Revolutionary War Timeline is divided into separate sections for easy reference. This section of the Revolutionary War Timeline marks the end of the war on April 11, 1783.

Discover interesting information and facts about American history via the Revolutionary War Timeline. This Revolutionary War Timeline provides a list detailing key events and dates of this amazing period in history. We have compiled a comprehensive Revolutionary War Timeline which provides a chronological list detailing the battles and conflicts in date order that were fought against the British in the American War of Independence. The Revolutionary War Timeline is the fastest and easiest way to gain a full overview of the history of America via the Revolutionary War Timeline.


Revolutionary War - Timeline, Facts and Battles - HISTORY

May 10, 1775 - Capture of Fort Ticonderoga
Troops: Patriot Militia 168 British 78.
Casualties: Patiot Militia 2 British (all captured).
Green Mountain Boys under Ethan Allen and Benedict Arnold capture the New York State fort, plus Fort Crown Point and Fort Saint-Jean during the next week. Armanents are transferred to fortify the siege at Boston, eventually forcing their withdraw from the city.

June 17, 1775 - Battle of Bunker Hill
Troops: Continental Army 2,400 British 3,000.
Casualties: Continental Army 450 British 1,054.
British attempt to occupy the hills (Bunker and Breed's) surrounding Boston Harbor during the siege of Boston, but encounter a constructed redoubt by the Continental forces. Three assaults led to a British victory when the Continental soldies ran out of ammunition. However, casualty losses for the British were high, causing caution approaches to front assaults in the future.

September 17 to November 3, 1775 - Siege of Fort Saint-Jean, Quebec Troops: Continental Army 1,850-2,350 British 832. Casualties: Continental Army 20-100, 900 sick British 43, 700 captured. Continental Army returns to the fort with troops under Robert Montgomery and begin a siege against the reinforced fort. British defend fort until nearby Fort Chamby falls on October 3, and reinforcements are thwarted from arriving. Lack of food and supplies causes surrender surrender leads to the fall of Montreal to the Continental Army without a fight ten days later.

November 19-21, 1775 - First Siege of Ninety-Six, South Carolina
Troops: Continental Army 560 British 1,900.
Casualties: Continental Army 13 British 24.
First major conflict in South Carolina of the war ends in stalement when Loyalists withdraw first, followed by the Patriots, who wished to sieze a shipment of gunpowder and ammunition sent to the Cherokee, but taken by the Loyalists. Battle would lead to additional battles to rid the area of Loyalists.

December 9, 1775 - Battle of Great Bridge (Chesapeake), Virginia Troops: Continental Army 861 British 409. Casualties: Continental Army 1 British 62-102. Continental Army repulses attack across Great Bridge by Governor Lord Dunmore and British loyalists, causing the departure of the Governor and control of Virginia early in the war for Federal sympathizers.

December 31, 1775 - Battle of Quebec
Troops: Continental Army 1,200, including militia British 1,800.
Casualties: Continental Army 84, 431 captured British 19.
Heavy losses for Continental troops occur in first major defeat of the war. General Montgomery is killed. Benedict Arnold wounded.

Note: Photo above: Image of the Battle of Lexington, Amos Doolittle. Date unknown, late 1700s, early 1800s. Image courtesy Library of Congress. Casualty and troop strength numbers from Wikipedia Commons via various sources.


Revolutionary War Battles in 1782:

January 2, 1782: Battle of Videau’s Bridge in South Carolina
Result: British victory

January 11-February 13, 1782: Siege of Brimstone Hill in the West Indies
Result: Franco-Patriot victory

January 11, 1782: Capture of Trincomalee at Ceylon
Result: British victory

January 22-February 5, 1782: Capture of Demerara and Essequibo in South America
Result: Franco-Patriot victory

January 25-26, 1782: Battle of Saint Kitts in the West Indies
Result: British victory

February 17, 1782: Battle of Sadras in India
Result: French victory

February 22, 1782: Capture of Montserrat in the West Indies
Result: French victory

February 24, 1782: Battle of Wambaw in South Carolina
Result: British victory

March 8, 1782 : Gnadenhütten massacre in Ohio

March 16, 1782: Battle of Roatán in present-day Honduras
Result: Patriot-Spanish victory

March 16, 1782: Action of 16 March 1782 in the Strait of Gibraltar
Result: British victory

March 22, 1782: Battle of Little Mountain in Virginia
Result: British-Iroquois victory

April 8, 1782: Battle of Delaware Bay in New Jersey
Result: Patriot victory

April 9-12, 1782: Battle of the Saintes in Dominica in the West Indies
Result: British victory

April 12, 1782 : Battle of Providien in Ceylon
Result: French victory

April-August, 1782: Battle of the Black River in present-day Honduras
Result: British victory

April 19, 1782: Battle of the Mona Passage in the West Indies
Result: British victory

April 20-21, 1782 : Action of 20–21 April 1782 in the Bay of Biscay
Result: British victory

May 6, 1782: Capture of the Bahamas in the West Indies
Result: Patriot-Spanish victory

May 25-June 12, 1782: Crawford expedition in Canada
Result: British-Iroquois victory

May 28-29, 1782 : Naval battle off Halifax in Nova Scotia
Result: British victory

July 1, 1782: Raid on Lunenburg in Nova Scotia
Result: Patriot victory

July 6, 1782: Battle of Negapatam in Ceylon
Result: British victory

August 8, 1782: Hudson Bay Expedition in Canada
Result: Franco-Patriot victory

August 15-17, 1782: Siege of Bryan Station in Virginia
Result: Patriot victory

August 19, 1782: Battle of Blue Licks in Virginia
Result: British-Iroquois victory

August 26, 1782: Battle of the Combahee River in South Carolina
Result: British victory

August 25-September 3, 1782 : Battle of Trincomalee in Ceylon
Result: French victory

September 11-13, 1782 Siege of Fort Henry in Virginia
Result: Patriot victory

September 13, 1782: Grand Assault on Gibraltar
Result: British victory

October 18, 1782: Action of 18 October 1782 off present-day Hispaniola
Result: British victory

October 20, 1782: Battle of Cape Spartel off the coast of present-day Morocco
Result: Indecisive

December 6, 1782 : Action of 6 December 1782 in the West Indies
Result: British victory


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