William Jefferson Clinton - History

William Jefferson Clinton - History


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William Jefferson Clinton

Clinton came to the White House campaigning as a representative of a "new generation." He is the first President to be born after World War II. Clinton was the second President in American history to be impeached.. Elected 1992, 1996


The Early Years


Bill Clinton was born William Jefferson Blythe IV in Hope, Arkansas on August 19, 1946. He was born three months after his father was killed in an automobile accident. He was left with his grandparents while his mother went back to school to become a nurse-anesthetist. In his first years of life Clinton spent a great deal of time in his grandfather's grocery store, in a racially mixed neighborhood. In 1950 Clinton's mother married Roger Clinton, and the family moved to Hot Springs. Clinton was officially adopted by his step-father, and assumed his name. Clinton grew up in comfortable middle class environment.

Unfortunately his step-father was an alcoholic who was prone to violence.

Clinton was an super-achiever in school, and participated in many extra-curricula activities. In 1963 Clinton was sent as the Arkansas representative to Boy's Nation a leadership training program in Washington. There he visited the White House and shook hands with President Kennedy. Clinton claims from that moment on, he decided on a career in politics. In 1964 Clinton, began college, at Georgetown University in Washington DC. While studying at Georgetown, Clinton worked part-time for Senator Fulbright of Arkansas. On graduating in 1968 with a degree in International Relations Clinton received a prestigious Rhodes scholarship to study in Oxford England.

Upon his return to the United States Clinton entered Yale University Law school, where he received a law degree in 1973. While at Yale, Clinton met his wife Hillary Rodham, who he wed in 1975.

After graduating from Yale, Clinton returned to Arkansas, where he briefly taught law at the University of Arkansas. In 1974 at the age of 28 Clinton ran for Congressman. He lost but managed to obtain 48.5% of the vote. In 1976 Clinton ran successfully for the position of state attorney general. In 1978 he beat four other contenders, to become the democratic candidate for governor of Arkansas. In 1979 he assumed the post, thus becoming the nation's youngest governor since 1938.

After two turbulent years in office Clinton was defeated in 1980 when he ran for reelection. Two years later he succeeded in returning to the governors mansion in Little Rock. He remained as governor for the seceding ten years.

During his tenure as governor, Clinton emphasized education reform in Arkansas.

Accomplishments in Office


President Clinton's early Presidency was been a complete reversal of the Bush Presidency. Clinton embarked on a number of major domestic initiatives. Foremost among them was health care reform. Those reforms failed to pass Congress, with the failure of his health care program his biggest defeat. He did manage to significantly narrow the budget deficit by a combination of spending cutbacks and an increase in taxes. By the end the Clinton Presidency these actios clearly had succeeded as the Federal budget moved from deficit to surplus for the the first time in a generation.

The election of a Republican Congress in 1994 forced Clinton to abandon his domestic proposals and limit his action to modifying Republican initiatives.

Clinton had been elected on a clear platform of making domestic affairs first on his agenda. The first two years of his Presidency reflected those priorities. His actions in foreign affairs were limited to promoting additional aid to Russia and the Baltic republics as well as insuring the passage of the North American Free Trade Zone. He placed greater emphasis on the economic aspects of foreign affairs. His administration played a minor roll in helping Israel and the PLO reach an agreement.

In the third year of the administration it became more heavily involved in foreign affairs. It led a UN invention in Haiti that returned civilian leadership. After two years of allowing the European powers to set the agenda on the War in Bosnia, the US government became actively involved in reaching an accord between the warring factions. That accord was reached under heavy American pressure in Dayton Ohio. The Clinton administration then led NATO in supplying troops to enforce the peace.

Clinton won reelection in 1996 on a platform that stressed his bridge to the 21st century.

In 1998 Clintonwas impeached by the House of Representatives on the basis of his testimony in the Paul Jones sexual harassment suite. He was acquitted by the Senate in early 1999. Clinton led the US intervention in Kosovo. That intervention which took the from of an air attack on Serbia. The result was a pull out of Serb troop in Kosovo.

The First Family

Wife: Hillary Rodham
Daughter: Chelsea

Major Events

Healthcare Reform
Intervention in Bosnia
Intervention in Kosovo
Impeachment
Bombing of the Cole

The Cabinet

Secretary of State: Warren Christopher, Madeline Albright
Secretary of The Treasury: Robert Rubin
Secretary of Defense: William Perry Cohen
Attorney General: Janet Reno
Secretary of The Interior: Bruce Babbit
Secretary of Agriculture: Mike Espey
Secretary of Commerce: Ron Brown
Secretary of Labor: Robert Reich
Secretary of Health & Human Services: Donna Shallela
Secretary of Housing & Urban Dev.: Henry Cisneros
Secretary of Energy: Hazel O'Leary
Secretary of Education: Richard Riley

Military

Bosnia Conflict
Kosovo


William Jefferson Clinton (1946 - )

Bill Clinton was born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946, in Hope, Arkansas. His father, an automobile-parts salesman, died in a car accident three months before Bill was born. His mother, Virginia Cassidy, married Roger Clinton, an automobile dealer, when Bill was seven years old. The family moved to Hot Springs, Arkansas, where Bill and his younger half brother, Roger, Jr., attended public schools. His mother often engaged Bill in political discussions and encouraged his ambitions. Growing up had its difficulties, however, because his stepfather was an alcoholic who sometimes beat his mother. Virginia and Roger eventually divorced but soon remarried, when Bill was 15. As a gesture Bill had his last name legally changed to Clinton.

Bill participated in many activities, including student government, at Hot Springs High School. In the summer of 1963 he was chosen to attend the American Legion Boys State, a government and leadership conference, in Little Rock, Arkansas. He was elected a senator and given the opportunity to go to Washington, D.C. where he shook hands with President John F. Kennedy. When Bill returned to Arkansas, politics became a pursuit from which he never wavered.

After high school, Clinton went to Georgetown University. While pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree in International Studies he worked for Democratic Senator William Fulbright of Arkansas, the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, who became an outspoken opponent of the Vietnam War. Clinton's own opposition to the war grew as he attended hearings and clipped newspapers.

Like his mentor, Fulbright, Clinton won a Rhodes scholarship to Oxford University. During his two years at Oxford Clinton's opposition to the Vietnam War came into conflict with his political aspirations. When he received a draft notice in 1969 he enrolled in the Army Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) at the University of Arkansas Law School. He made himself available for the draft but was never called up because he received a high number in the draft lottery held that year.

In the fall of 1970 Clinton entered Yale Law School. While at Yale Clinton met Hillary Rodham, a Wellesley College graduate from suburban Chicago. Together they worked for George McGovern's presidential campaign in Texas during the summer and fall of 1972. The following year they graduated from law school. Clinton worked briefly in Washington, D.C., as a staff attorney for the House Judiciary Committee but soon moved back to Arkansas.

In 1974, Clinton entered his first political race. He felt that Republican Congressman John Paul Hammerschmidt, a strong supporter of President Nixon, was vulnerable in his reelection bid, and therefore decided to run against him. Clinton lost a surprisingly close race, holding Hammerschmidt to only 52 percent of the vote.

Clinton married Hillary Rodham in 1975. A year later he was elected Arkansas's attorney general. In 1978 Clinton decided to run for governor of Arkansas. He won the election against Republican State Chairman A. Lynn Lowe, receiving 63 percent of the vote to Lowe's 37 percent.

In an attempt to move Arkansas up from the bottom of the indexes of social and economic welfare he made economic growth and educational improvement top priorities of his administration. His administration was also noteworthy in Arkansas history for appointing women and minorities to cabinet-level jobs. Nevertheless, during his two-year term Clinton angered many voters. In 1980, the same year as daughter Chelsea was born, his reelection chances were damaged further by his handling of the Cuban refugee situation. Thousands of Cubans who had left or been expelled from their country were housed in Arkansas, and Clinton was unable to force the White House to make other states share the problems and costs of the operation. That November he was defeated by Republican Frank White, a political newcomer and businessman.

After this defeat, Clinton began to work for a law firm, but many observers believed that his political career was far from over. In 1982 he made a succesful bid to return to the governor's mansion a residency he did not give up until he entered the White House in 1993.

On October 3, 1991, Clinton announced that he was a candidate for the presidency. His campaign was nearly sunk by charges of marital infidelity, published in tabloid newspapers, and of unethical conduct in legally avoiding the draft during the Vietnam War. The nickname "Slick Willie", given to him by an Arkansas journalist, was used by those critical of him. He survived, however, and on June 2, 1992, primary victories in six states gave him the necessary number of convention delegates. Shortly before the party convention in July Clinton chose Tennessee Senator Albert A. Gore, Jr., as his running mate.

The Democratic National Convention was held in New York City in mid-July. As soon as the convention was over Clinton and Gore headed west for a series of campaign bus trips reminiscent of the whistle-stop train trips of decades before. The strategy of identifying with middle-class America and emphasizing concern for jobs and health care paid off. On Tuesday, November 3, Clinton was elected president, and he took office on January 20, 1993. At the age of 46, he was one of the youngest men ever, and the first Democrat since the 1976 election, to be elected to the nation's highest office.

Clinton entered office with a wide-ranging agenda. He immediately appointed his wife to head a task force to deal with health-care reform to try to make health care available for all. By cutting federal spending, creating millions of new jobs, and reducing the deficit, he wanted to restore economic opportunity and security. And in order to make communities and schools more secure he enacted the Assault Weapons Ban as part of the Crime Bill.

In foreign policy, he failed to get a European consensus for action in the Bosnian civil war. However, he did help Israel and Jordan achieve an historic peace treaty and assisted in the creation of an accord between Israel and the Palestinians. Furthermore, he contributed to the cease-fire in Northern Ireland.


William J. Clinton

Bill Clinton is an American politician from Arkansas who served as the 42nd President of the United States (1993-2001). He took office at the end of the Cold War, and was the first baby-boomer generation President.

During the administration of William Jefferson Clinton, the U.S. enjoyed more peace and economic well being than at any time in its history. He was the first Democratic president since Franklin D. Roosevelt to win a second term. He could point to the lowest unemployment rate in modern times, the lowest inflation in 30 years, the highest home ownership in the country’s history, dropping crime rates in many places, and reduced welfare rolls. He proposed the first balanced budget in decades and achieved a budget surplus. As part of a plan to celebrate the millennium in 2000, Clinton called for a great national initiative to end racial discrimination.

After the failure in his second year of a huge program of health care reform, Clinton shifted emphasis, declaring “the era of big government is over.” He sought legislation to upgrade education, to protect jobs of parents who must care for sick children, to restrict handgun sales, and to strengthen environmental rules.

President Clinton was born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946, in Hope, Arkansas, three months after his father died in a traffic accident. When he was four years old, his mother wed Roger Clinton, of Hot Springs, Arkansas. In high school, he took the family name.

He excelled as a student and as a saxophone player and once considered becoming a professional musician. As a delegate to Boys Nation while in high school, he met President John Kennedy in the White House Rose Garden. The encounter led him to enter a life of public service.

Clinton graduated from Georgetown University and in 1968 won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford University. He received a law degree from Yale University in 1973, and entered politics in Arkansas.

He was defeated in his campaign for Congress in Arkansas’s Third District in 1974. The next year he married Hillary Rodham, a graduate of Wellesley College and Yale Law School. In 1980, Chelsea, their only child, was born.

Clinton was elected Arkansas Attorney General in 1976, and won the governorship in 1978. After losing a bid for a second term, he regained the office four years later, and served until he defeated incumbent George Bush and third party candidate Ross Perot in the 1992 presidential race.

Clinton and his running mate, Tennessee’s Senator Albert Gore Jr., then 44, represented a new generation in American political leadership. For the first time in 12 years both the White House and Congress were held by the same party. But that political edge was brief the Republicans won both houses of Congress in 1994.


Accomplishments in Office


President Clinton's early Presidency was been a complete reversal of the Bush Presidency. Clinton embarked on a number of major domestic initiatives. Foremost among them was health care reform. Those reforms failed to pass Congress, with the failure of his health care program his biggest defeat. He did manage to significantly narrow the budget deficit by a combination of spending cutbacks and an increase in taxes. By the end the Clinton Presidency these actios clearly had succeeded as the Federal budget moved from deficit to surplus for the the first time in a generation.

The election of a Republican Congress in 1994 forced Clinton to abandon his domestic proposals and limit his action to modifying Republican initiatives.

Clinton had been elected on a clear platform of making domestic affairs first on his agenda. The first two years of his Presidency reflected those priorities. His actions in foreign affairs were limited to promoting additional aid to Russia and the Baltic republics as well as insuring the passage of the North American Free Trade Zone. He placed greater emphasis on the economic aspects of foreign affairs. His administration played a minor roll in helping Israel and the PLO reach an agreement.

In the third year of the administration it became more heavily involved in foreign affairs. It led a UN invention in Haiti that returned civilian leadership. After two years of allowing the European powers to set the agenda on the War in Bosnia, the US government became actively involved in reaching an accord between the warring factions. That accord was reached under heavy American pressure in Dayton Ohio. The Clinton administration then led NATO in supplying troops to enforce the peace.

Clinton won reelection in 1996 on a platform that stressed his bridge to the 21st century.

In 1998 Clintonwas impeached by the House of Representatives on the basis of his testimony in the Paul Jones sexual harassment suite. He was acquitted by the Senate in early 1999. Clinton led the US intervention in Kosovo. That intervention which took the from of an air attack on Serbia. The result was a pull out of Serb troop in Kosovo.

The First Family

Wife: Hillary Rodham
Daughter: Chelsea

Major Events

Healthcare Reform
Intervention in Bosnia
Intervention in Kosovo
Impeachment
Bombing of the Cole

The Cabinet

Secretary of State: Warren Christopher, Madeline Albright
Secretary of The Treasury: Robert Rubin
Secretary of Defense: William Perry Cohen
Attorney General: Janet Reno
Secretary of The Interior: Bruce Babbit
Secretary of Agriculture: Mike Espey
Secretary of Commerce: Ron Brown
Secretary of Labor: Robert Reich
Secretary of Health & Human Services: Donna Shallela
Secretary of Housing & Urban Dev.: Henry Cisneros
Secretary of Energy: Hazel O'Leary
Secretary of Education: Richard Riley

Did You Know?

Clinton was the first President born after World War II
The second president impeached


RESOLUTION

Resolved, That William Jefferson Clinton, President of the United States, is impeached for high crimes and misdemeanors, and that the following articles of impeachment be exhibited to the United States Senate:

Articles of impeachment exhibited by the House of Representatives of the United States of America in the name of itself and of the people of the United States of America, against William Jefferson Clinton, President of the United States of America, in maintenance and support of its impeachment against him for high crimes and misdemeanors.

In his conduct while President of the United States, William Jefferson Clinton, in violation of his constitutional oath faithfully to execute the office of President of the United States and, to the best of his ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States, and in violation of his constitutional duty to take care that the laws be faithfully executed, has willfully corrupted and manipulated the judicial process of the United States for his personal gain and exoneration, impeding the administration of justice, in that:

On August 17, 1998, William Jefferson Clinton swore to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth before a Federal grand jury of the United States. Contrary to that oath, William Jefferson Clinton willfully provided perjurious, false and misleading testimony to the grand jury concerning one or more of the following: (1) the nature and details of his relationship with a subordinate Government employee (2) prior perjurious, false and misleading testimony he gave in a Federal civil rights action brought against him (3) prior false and misleading statements he allowed his attorney to make to a Federal judge in that civil rights action and (4) his corrupt efforts to influence the testimony of witnesses and to impede the discovery of evidence in that civil rights action.

In doing this, William Jefferson Clinton has undermined the integrity of his office, has brought disrepute on the Presidency, has betrayed his trust as President, and has acted in a manner subversive of the rule of law and justice, to manifest injury of the people of the United States.

Wherefore, William Jefferson Clinton, by such conduct, warrants impeachment and trial, and removal from office and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States.

In his conduct while President of the United States, William Jefferson Clinton, in violation of his constitutional oath faithfully to execute the office of President of the United States and, to the best of his ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States, and in violation of his constitutional duty to take care that the laws be faithfully executed, has prevented, obstructed, and impeded the administration of justice, and has to that end engaged personally, and through his subordinates and agents, in a course of conduct or scheme designed to delay, impede, cover up, and conceal the existence of evidence and testimony related to a Federal civil rights action brought against him in a duly instituted judicial proceeding.

The means used to implement this course of conduct or scheme included one or more of the following acts:

(1) On or about December 17, 1997, William Jefferson Clinton corruptly encouraged a witness in a Federal civil rights action brought against him to execute a sworn affidavit in that proceeding that he knew to be perjurious, false and misleading.

(2) On or about December 17, 1997, William Jefferson Clinton corruptly encouraged a witness in a Federal civil rights action brought against him to give perjurious, false and misleading testimony if and when called to testify personally in that proceeding.

(3) On or about December 28, 1997, William Jefferson Clinton corruptly engaged in, encouraged, or supported a scheme to conceal evidence that had been subpoenaed in a Federal civil rights action brought against him.

(4) Beginning on or about December 7, 1997, and continuing through and including January 14, 1998, William Jefferson Clinton intensified and succeeded in an effort to secure job assistance to a witness in a Federal civil rights action brought against him in order to corruptly prevent the truthful testimony of that witness in that proceeding at a time when the truthful testimony of that witness would have been harmful to him.

(5) On January 17, 1998, at his deposition in a Federal civil rights action brought against him, William Jefferson Clinton corruptly allowed his attorney to make false and misleading statements to a Federal judge characterizing an affidavit, in order to prevent questioning deemed relevant by the judge. Such false and misleading statements were subsequently acknowledged by his attorney in a communication to that judge.

(6) On or about January 18 and January 20-21, 1998, William Jefferson Clinton related a false and misleading account of events relevant to a Federal civil rights action brought against him to a potential witness in that proceeding, in order to corruptly influence the testimony of that witness.

(7) On or about January 21, 23, and 26, 1998, William Jefferson Clinton made false and misleading statements to potential witnesses in a Federal grand jury proceeding in order to corruptly influence the testimony of those witnesses. The false and misleading statements made by William Jefferson Clinton were repeated by the witnesses to the grand jury, causing the grand jury to receive false and misleading information.

In all of this, William Jefferson Clinton has undermined the integrity of his office, has brought disrepute on the Presidency, has betrayed his trust as President, and has acted in a manner subversive of the rule of law and justice, to the manifest injury of the people of the United States.

Wherefore, William Jefferson Clinton, by such conduct, warrants impeachment and trial, and removal from office and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States.

Passed the House of Representatives December 19, 1998.

Speaker of the House of Representatives.


Bill Clinton: Life Before the Presidency

William Jefferson Clinton spent the first six years of his life in Hope, Arkansas, where he was born on August 19, 1946. His father, William Jefferson Blythe, had died in an auto accident several months before his mother, Virginia Cassidy Blythe, gave birth to the future President. Raised in the home of his grandmother, Edith Cassidy, Bill's early years were dominated by two strong women, who often competed for his attention. His mother, a vivacious and fun-loving free spirit, was often away from home taking nursing classes in New Orleans. It was during those periods that his grandmother, a temperamental and strong-willed disciplinarian, tried to shape her grandson's character—and taught him to be a very early reader. Bill later remembered loving both women during that time of his life but feeling torn between them as a young mediator of their arguments.

In 1950, Bill's mother married Roger Clinton, a car dealer and abusive alcoholic. The family moved to Hot Springs, Arkansas, a bustling resort town an hour away. (She later divorced Roger Clinton when Bill was fifteen, only to remarry him quickly thereafter.) Again, Clinton had to intervene between two adults engaged in violent arguments. As a teenager, Bill excelled in school and showed a passion for politics. He played saxophone in a high school band and especially loved the gospel music of his Baptist faith. The fun of gambling dens and mineral spas competed for Bill's attention with Baptist churches and politics. But while his mother went to the racetracks on Sunday, Bill attended church, principally to hear the music he loved. In this small community, Bill was widely recognized as a young man of rare talent and ambition.

An Education for Leadership

Hot Springs High School, although a segregated all-white school, stood heads above most public schools in Arkansas. School Principal Johnnie Mae Mackey—another strong woman in Clinton's life—recruited staff committed to producing leaders who thought of personal success in terms of public service. Clinton became her brightest protégé. It was under her mentoring that Clinton was sent to Washington, D.C., as one of two Arkansas delegates to Boy's Nation, an imitation political convention sponsored by the American Legion. While there, the seventeen-year-old Clinton was captured in a historic photograph shaking hands with his political idol, President John F. Kennedy, in the White House Rose Garden. That July 1963 handshake later symbolized the continuity between the Kennedy 1960s and the Clinton 1990s. Ever since he was child, Clinton's mother had told him that he would some day be President of the United States. The Kennedy handshake left Clinton determined to fulfill her prediction. (Virginia Clinton lived to see her son become President, dying in 1994 of cancer.)

Upon graduation from high school in 1964, Clinton left Little Rock to attend Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. An international affairs major, he managed to cover his expenses through scholarships and by working part-time jobs. At this Catholic-sponsored, well-heeled institution, the student body clearly looked upon Clinton as an outsider from backwoods Arkansas. Although a clique of students running the newspaper discouraged Clinton's efforts to contribute to the school, his energy, dashing good looks, and personal charm pushed him to the top in student government. He won the presidency of his freshman and sophomore classes. In his junior year, Clinton ran for president of the student council, but lost in a stunning defeat. In attempting to please everybody, Clinton had miscalculated. He looked too political to his peers, and they elected his lesser-known opponent.

Rhodes Scholar and Vietnam Draftee

Beginning in his junior year, Clinton worked as a clerk for the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee. At that time, the powerful committee was headed by Senator J. William Fulbright of Arkansas, a leading critic of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. The experience greatly shaped Clinton's perspective as he came to believe, as did Fulbright, that the United States had no moral or strategic reason for being in Vietnam. Just prior to his graduation from Georgetown, he won a prized Rhodes scholarship to study at Oxford University in England for two years. However, he faced being drafted for the Vietnam War due to a change in federal policy that eliminated almost all college deferments. His local draft board in Arkansas, however, allowed him to sail for England.

While in England, Clinton received his draft notice. He then returned to Arkansas, and with the help of Fulbright's office and that of Governor Winthrop Rockefeller, managed to persuade the admissions staff of the Reserve Officers' Training Corp (ROTC) program at the University of Arkansas Law School to accept him the next fall. Instead he returned to Oxford, although the evidence is unclear as to whether this was done with the approval of his ROTC contacts. Back in England, Clinton evidently remained conflicted about his decision to avoid the draft, torn between his moral convictions that the war was wrong and his sense of kinship with former classmates who were serving and dying in Vietnam. In the fall of 1969, he chose to re-subject himself to the draft—doing so, however, at a time when Nixon administration policy seemed to suggest that future call-ups of combat troops would significantly decline. In any event, Clinton's luck held when his birth date in the lottery drew the high number of 311, distant enough to ensure that he would never be called. Clinton then wrote a letter to the director of the Arkansas ROTC program thanking him for "saving" him from the draft, explaining that he still loved his country while nevertheless despising the war. In England, Clinton participated in numerous antiwar demonstrations, and both his antiwar activities and his ROTC letter resurfaced years later during his bid for the presidency in 1992. Although Clinton remained in the Rhodes Scholar program, making many contacts with students who would later become part of his administration, his Oxford coursework never added up to a degree.

Law, Politics, and Marriage

In 1970, Clinton entered Yale Law School, earning his degree in 1973 and meeting his future wife, Hillary Rodham, whom he married in 1975. During this period he also worked on the 1970 U.S. Senate campaign of Joe Duffy in Connecticut, and toward the end of his studies he managed the Texas campaign of the Democratic presidential nominee George McGovern (who lost Texas in the Nixon landslide). After graduation, Clinton moved back to Arkansas with a job teaching law at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. Almost as soon as he arrived home, Clinton threw himself into politics, running for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives against incumbent Republican John Paul Hammerschmidt. Although Clinton lost this 1974 race, it was the closest election for Hammerschmidt in his twenty-six years in Congress, marking Clinton as a rising political star.

Two years later, Arkansas voters elected Clinton state attorney general. Then in 1978, at age thirty-two, Clinton ran for governor, winning an easy victory and becoming one of the nation's youngest governors ever. However, his youth and inexperience quickly left Arkansans unimpressed. Governor Clinton had several missteps, including difficulties in handling rioting among Cuban refugees temporarily interned by the federal government at Fort Chaffee, Arkansas. He also raised auto license fees to pay for road construction and alienated the state's powerful timber interests by an unsuccessful intervention in the controversy over the practice of clear-cutting. Consequently, the voters turned him out in favor of Frank White, a little known, freshly minted Republican savings and loan executive. Clinton became the youngest former governor in American history.

Shocked by his defeat, Clinton went to work for a Little Rock law firm but spent most of his time campaigning for reelection. In the 1982 race, Clinton admitted his mistakes and used his incredible charm and well-honed TV ads to convince the voters to give him another chance. He won in 1982 and again in 1984. Voters then supported him for two, four-year terms in 1986 and 1990.

As governor, Clinton championed centrist issues. He strongly advocated educational reform, appointing Hillary Clinton to lead a committee to draft higher standards for Arkansas schools. One of the administration's proposals called for competence tests for all teachers, a policy development that stirred up a national debate. Governor Clinton's sweeping education reforms positively impacted Arkansas schools, which experienced a decrease in dropout rates and an increase in college-entrance exam test scores under his watch, although the state's overall rankings moved very little. During Clinton's tenure as governor of Arkansas, he favored capital punishment. He promoted welfare reforms aimed at pushing welfare recipients into the workforce and moved decisively to promote affirmative action—appointing more African Americans to state boards, commissions, and agency posts than all of his predecessors combined. Additionally, he initiated a style of government that resembled a permanent election campaign. Using the talents of the political consultant Dick Morris, Clinton pushed legislative agendas based upon public opinion polls. The governor and his strategist then built support for their policies through well-orchestrated sales campaigns that used television, leaflets, and telephone banks to pressure state lawmakers.

Creating a National Image

Setting his sights higher, Clinton used his five terms as Arkansas governor to cultivate a national profile for himself. He soon emerged as one of the leading reform governors in the Democratic Party. In 1986 and 1987, Clinton served as chairman of the National Governors Association, speaking on behalf of the nation's governors. Shrewdly charting a new course, Clinton helped guide the Democratic Leadership Council, a group of moderate Democrats and business people who worked to affect national policies. In 1990 and 1991, Governor Clinton led the council's drive to lure back the white male vote into party columns without alienating blacks and women. With the goal of strengthening and unifying the party, Clinton used his persuasive oratorical skills to argue that the Republicans were using the issue of race to gain political advantages, and that race should not divide Americans who agreed on economic and other social issues.

He insisted on pragmatism and moderation in government programs, a centrist platform that emphasized opportunity, jobs, law and order, and responsibility. This meant that the government should provide opportunities for all citizens when the free market failed, but individuals had to accept the responsibility to work and to contribute to the common civil order. This linking of the time-honored American enshrinement of work and individualism to a progressive view of the role of government became for Clinton a "New Covenant"—the philosophical perspective behind his reference to himself as a "New Democrat."

In 1988, however, Clinton damaged his chances for higher office. He was picked to give one of the nominating speeches for Michael Dukakis at the Democratic National Convention. He delivered a long, boring speech emphasizing policy and programs that many thought would doom his chances to run for President. A quickly arranged appearance on the "Tonight Show" with Johnny Carson enabled Clinton to poke fun at his blunder and thus deftly rescue his image before a large national television audience.


1992 Presidential Election

In 1992 Clinton easily defeated his competitors in the Democratic primaries to become the party&aposs nominee for the presidency, choosing Tennessee Senator Al Gore as his vice-presidential running mate. The Republican incumbent, President George H.W. Bush, was vulnerable in the election of 1992 because he had broken his celebrated campaign promise not to raise taxes and, especially, because the national economy was mired in recession.

Although Clinton&aposs campaign was troubled by accusations of draft dodging and rumors of marital infidelity, he managed to turn the narrative by portraying himself as a hard-working, family man. Additionally, he successfully hammered home his economic message, underscored by chief strategist James Carville&aposs pithy slogan, "It&aposs the economy, stupid."

Clinton was also aided by the surprisingly successful third-party campaign of billionaire Ross Perot, who siphoned off a significant portion of the Republican vote from President Bush. On November 3, 1992, Clinton was elected the 42nd president of the United States.


William Jefferson Clinton - History


During the administration of William Jefferson Clinton, the U.S. enjoyed more peace and economic well being than at any time in its history. He was the first Democratic president since Franklin D. Roosevelt to win a second term. He could point to the lowest unemployment rate in modern times, the lowest inflation in 30 years, the highest home ownership in the country's history, dropping crime rates in many places, and reduced welfare rolls. He proposed the first balanced budget in decades and achieved a budget surplus. As part of a plan to celebrate the millennium in 2000, Clinton called for a great national initiative to end racial discrimination.

After the failure in his second year of a huge program of health care reform, Clinton shifted emphasis, declaring "the era of big government is over." He sought legislation to upgrade education, to protect jobs of parents who must care for sick children, to restrict handgun sales, and to strengthen environmental rules.

President Clinton was born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946, in Hope, Arkansas, three months after his father died in a traffic accident. When he was four years old, his mother wed Roger Clinton, of Hot Springs, Arkansas. In high school, he took the family name.

He excelled as a student and as a saxophone player and once considered becoming a professional musician. As a delegate to Boys Nation while in high school, he met President John Kennedy in the White House Rose Garden. The encounter led him to enter a life of public service.

Clinton was graduated from Georgetown University and in 1968 won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford University. He received a law degree from Yale University in 1973, and entered politics in Arkansas.

He was defeated in his campaign for Congress in Arkansas's Third District in 1974. The next year he married Hillary Rodham, a graduate of Wellesley College and Yale Law School. In 1980, Chelsea, their only child, was born.

Clinton was elected Arkansas Attorney General in 1976, and won the governorship in 1978. After losing a bid for a second term, he regained the office four years later, and served until he defeated incumbent George Bush and third party candidate Ross Perot in the 1992 presidential race.

Clinton and his running mate, Tennessee's Senator Albert Gore Jr., then 44, represented a new generation in American political leadership. For the first time in 12 years both the White House and Congress were held by the same party. But that political edge was brief the Republicans won both houses of Congress in 1994.


William Jefferson Clinton - History

Comment: The condition has several other names, including gastroesophageal reflux, GE reflux, and GERD.

In sum, Clinton had five exercise tolerance tests while President it was felt at his last Presidential physical examination (in 2001) that another such test was unwarranted. He started taking simvastatin (Zocor) at that time, because of elevated cholesterol levels, as discussed in a press conference MORE.

In September 2004 Clinton needed urgent coronary bypass surgery (see below).

After leaving office, Clinton was on the South Beach diet for an unknown time, and did lose weight 4 -- and then needed a bypass operation.

An allergist evaluated him in autumn 1991 and reported 1e:

Clinton continued to have allergy symptoms while President.

Editorial: Dr. Zebra is a little bitter over this failure of leadership. Clinton's refusal lent credence to the crackpots and conspiracy theorists who used anthrax vaccination to sow suspicion and discontent in the military. (To his credit, Secretary of Defense Cohen was immunized.)

Had the operation required general anesthesia, Clinton had planned to transfer Presidential authority to Vice President Gore under terms of the 25th Amendment 9. Clinton was awake during the entire operation and "was alert most of the time" 8.

Clinton's attorney responded: "In terms of size, shape, direction, whatever the devious mind wants to concoct, the President is a normal man. There are no blemishes, there are no moles, there are no growths." 11 (Monica Lewinsky also disagreed with Jones' description 12.)

By February 1998 the hoopla over this particular facet had muted.

Comment: Jones' description is not reprinted here. It lacks the detail necessary to determine whether Clinton has "Peyronie disease," which has been a topic of speculation. It is interesting, however, that Clinton had an exuberant fibrotic reaction in his chest after his coronary bypass operation. Fibrosis is the basis of Peyronie disease.

Comment: The House of Representatives impeached Clinton on December 19, 1998, thereby helping establish "Dr. Zebra's Law" which states: "Any president whose genital morphology becomes a topic of public discussion will be impeached." See the page for Donald Trump.

Clinton ultimately underwent successful bypass.

Comment: Apparently Clinton had unstable angina, not a heart attack. Dr. Zebra has not, however, seen this explicitly mentioned in published reports. Angina (a type of chest discomfort) occurs when heart muscle is starved for oxygen. This starvation may or may not cause part of the starved muscle to die. By contrast, a heart attack ("myocardial infarction") has occurred when part of the heart muscle has died, however small. Blood tests are the best way to distinguish angina from a heart attack.

I knew I would never get used to the Secret Service agent posted outside our bedroom door. This was standard operating procedure for past Presidents, and the Secret Service was adament, at first, about keeping it that way.

"What if the President has a heart attack in the middle of the night?" one agent asked me when I suggested he station himself downstairs instead of with us on the second floor.

"He's 46 years old and in great health," I said. "He's not going to have a heart attack!"


Bill Clinton (Differently)

William Jefferson Clinton (né Blythe III born August 19, 1946) is an Confederate politician and attorney who served as the 23rd president of the Confederate States from 1993 to 1999. Prior to his presidency, he served as governor of Arkansas (1979–1981 and 1983–1992) and as attorney general of Arkansas (1977–1979). A member of the Dixiecrat Party, Clinton was instrumental in leading the party’s policy’s into becoming more liberal, and in turn helped lead to the creation of the Booth Party.

Clinton was born and raised in Arkansas and attended the University of Arkansas, and the University Richmond. He met model Beverle Buell while practicing law in Richmond and they married in 1975, and the couple had a daughter Liv in 1978. After graduating from law school, Clinton returned to Arkansas and won election as state attorney general, followed by two non-consecutive terms as Arkansas governor. As governor, he overhauled the state's education system and oversaw the transition of the state in the post American War Years. Clinton was elected president in 1992, defeating Readjuster opponent Texas Senator Phil Gramm. At age 46, he became the third-youngest president in history.

Clinton presided over the Confederate recovery from the Confederate financial crisis which began following the United States ending foreign aid to the Confederate States in 1989. He signed into law the American Free Trade Agreement with Mexico, and many of the South American nations, and the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act. Clinton did fail to pass the reestablishment universal health care.

In 1998 Clinton fell under criticism for claims he had sexual relations with interns and staff at the President’s Executive Mansion. A call to commence impeachment proceedings against Clinton was made in the House of Representatives but was not passed by the Dixiecrat controlled majority. Shortly after leaving office Clinton’s wife Beverle would file for divorce.

Despite this black mark near the end of his administration, Clinton left office with one of highest end-of-office approval rating of any C.S. president and has continually received high scores in the historical rankings of the nation’s presidents.

Since leaving office, he has been involved in public speaking and humanitarian work. He created the William J. Clinton Foundation to address international causes such as the prevention of AIDS and global warming. In 2004, Clinton published his autobiography, My Life. In 2005 Clinton married model Melania Knauss and the couple had a son in 2006. He is also the Father-In-Law of Georgia Senator Ben Affleck.



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